NetBSD Planet


April 21, 2024

Pullup 10 [pullup-10 #672] install xsetwallpaper manual page
/r/NetBSD Bikeshedding a name for pkgsrc's unbranded Firefox

heya folks,

Recently a few reviews have noted being very confused by our version of Firefox being called Nightly for trademark reasons (even the extended upport versions!)

Changing this is really quite trivial, I have a few proposals you can vote on here. NON-BINDING:

https://www.rcv123.org/ballot/kqm4LGKH5yKXsqZg857ChY

Please rank your choices in order of preference.

Mostly, they are inspired by this image of a prairie dog which some of us have taken up as an "unofficial NetBSD mascot" (also used in this subreddit's sidebar, if you use old reddit):

http://netbsd.org/~nia/prairiedog.jpg

NIH of course means Not Invented Here, a long-stanading meme in the BSD community and wider hacker culture.

However, they're meant to be neutral. This is for the version of Firefox from pkgsrc (not just NetBSD), and some cultures may have negative associations with the word dog.

thanks for your time!

submitted by /u/nia_netbsd
[link] [comments]
/r/NetBSD Problem with building luna68k

Fairly new to this field, when I am trying to build the lastest luna68k kernel I got

*** Failed target: dependall

*** Failed command: cd "/Users/snow/Code/netBSD/tools/gcc"; /Users/snow/Code/netBSD/build/obj/tooldir.Darwin-23.4.0-arm64/bin/nbmake realall

Could someone here provide me with some insights on this please?

submitted by /u/Tasty-Snow-9451
[link] [comments]

April 20, 2024

/r/NetBSD NetBSD 10 fresh install. Home built computer with Radeon HD 5450 graphics card issue.

So, I finally have a working NetBSD system to learn on. However, I have a weird problem with the graphics card. I have looked at dmesg and done an hw-probe. Both confirm that the correct driver is loaded - radeon. As you can see from the picture, things are not well. I have tried running # X -configure but was told that it failed. The xorg.conf man page talks about it being possible to create a file:

Section “Device” Identifier Radeon Driver radeon entries (not sure what goes here) EndSection

Should this be created as /etc/X11/xorg.conf?

submitted by /u/globetrotterdk
[link] [comments]

April 19, 2024

/r/NetBSD Hard disk clone and set dual boot. What's the best way to do this?

So I have a first gen intel macbook pro (32-bit) incoming and I want to install NetBSD on it. It has a hdd so that I will switch to a ssd.

I want to keep the OS X Snow Leopard on the system and set up a dual boot, since Macports and Fink have some support for it and the open source radeon drivers for the GPU don't support H. 264 video decoding, so I might want switch to that here and there.

Problem is that I don't have the original installation disc for os x, so I kind of need to keep that installation intact. And I'm unsure what's the best way to handle this...

My thought is to partition the OS X installation to a smaller size using disk utility on the Mac. Swap in the Ssd. Install netbsd and partition the drive so that I leave enough space for the OS x on the hdd. Then use my sata to usb cable with hdd and dd that OS x partition on to the new partition.

But I have never done this and I'm unsure if netbsd and/or Mac OS x will 'play nice' with my plan.

So I'm kind of looking for thoughts, experiences and suggestions for this?

submitted by /u/Ibnabraham
[link] [comments]
UnitedBSD 64 and 32bit Install on a scsi system

Found a nice compac machine from 2004.
Have been using it as a Win2k machine but i wanted to put it to use.

Sorry

So i found som old Enterprise gear, 18gb SCSI
And a pci scsi contoler.
Adaptec AWA 2940
Neither OpenBSD or NetBSD can handle either scsi controler
gives me

eisop0 unexpected phase mismatch

Duckduckgo gave me

https://lists.gnu.org/archive/html/qemu-devel/2024-03/msg00343.html

So atm i am stuck with Linux

I am asking. Whats going on?
Can i do something?

ive also tried this on a socket 775 machine that why i put 64bit in the headline

Pullup 10 [pullup-10 #671] Fwd: CVS commit: src/sys/uvm/pmap
Pullup 10 [pullup-10 #670] update floating point constants in vax/unimpl_emul.S

April 18, 2024

UnitedBSD Few NetBSD-specific bugs

Since most of you seem to be using NetBSD as your main BSD, I want to ask a few questions on how to fix certain things.

First one is about the terminal.
Whenever I do something like git diff, the message "WARNING: terminal is not fully functional" shows up before it executes the command, and when I do top, I get "top: can't open termcap file".
Terminal emulator is Suckless st, and shell is ZSH.

Second one is more specific about ZSH.
The home, end, and delete keys don't seem to function as expected in the shell.
In Neovim, the home key works, the end key doesn't, and delete key opens help.txt in a separate buffer.

Third thing is that even though I'm using OhMyZSH, NetBSD is seemingly the only OS where I can't seem to go up in history based on user input.
On OpenBSD, FreeBSD, Linux, OpenIndiana, and even macOS, if I write "ne" and do arrow up, it'll rotate between "neofetch" and "neomutt", and pressing tab will highlight words that start with "ne" so I can autocomplete it.
But on NetBSD, writing "ne" and arrow up will just give me whatever the last command was, and pressing tab will spawn a list of programs starting with "ne", but are not selectable at all, so it behaves much more like GNU Bash.

And the forth thing is more something I can't understand, and that's Neofetch reporting I'm using up 7 GiB of RAM out of 8 GiB, even though I have nothing running apart from ST, CWM, and SSH in the background.
Very similar to how memory usage shows up in FreeBSD, except in FreeBSD I'm using ZFS, but on NetBSD that's just UFS.
So why is that?

As for the first 3 problems, any ideas how to fix those?

Pullup pkgsrc [pullup-pkgsrc #6850] Please update firefox115 to 115.10.0

April 17, 2024

/r/NetBSD NetBSD turns 30 and releases version 10
submitted by /u/foxwolfdogcat
[link] [comments]

April 16, 2024

Pullup 10 [pullup-10 #669] Fix ccd(4) PR 58043
Pullup 10 [pullup-10 #668] Procfs fix PRs 39913 and 57775

April 14, 2024

DragonFly BSD Digest Lazy Reading for 2024/04/14

If you sorta squint and tilt your head, it’s a games theme this week.

Your unrelated music for the week: New Strategies for Modern Crime Vol 1.  (via)


April 13, 2024

Ruben Schade A thread about people who need to run Windows

Hi! My name is Ruben Schade, and I’m a solution architect for an indie cloud company who mostly runs Linux, but tries to use FreeBSD and NetBSD where he can. This is my story. LAW AND ORDER DUN DUN

The post

Yesterday I saw the news that Microsoft will be including ads in an upcoming Windows 11 update, which so perfectly encapsulates all that’s wrong with modern IT. I saw a few people post about it on Mastodon, which generated dozens of comments from Linux fans saying the real solution was to switch to their OS.

Before I went to bed, I posted:

Linux people, please understand this. Sometimes people need to run Windows. They’re allowed to complain about Windows ads, or tracking, or any other enshittification problems, without you saying “use Linux” every time.

Suffice to say, I woke up to a storm of certain Linux people… not understanding this. But a few themes emerged, which I thought I’d respond to in aggregate here instead.

Replies that miss/ignore the point

Replies that address the point

By Ruben Schade in Sydney, 2024-04-14.

UnitedBSD PCI passthrough with QEMU

I have a machine capable of PCI passthrough with Linux+libvirt. So I know it's supported by BIOS and hardware.

I have installed QEMU in the this machine with NetBSD. When I run QEMU with -device vfio-pci,host=<some id> I get this error:

qemu-system-x86_64: -device vfio-pci: 'vfio-pci' is not a valid device model name

I can't find a tutorial to use IOMMU with NetBSD. Is it possible to do PCI passthrough when the host is NetBSD? How do I do it?

UnitedBSD Router device & NetBSD

Hi,

This probable doesn’t have exactly relationship with NetBSD! I want to configure a DNS in my router device using OpenDNS.com IP! I want to block adult content site for that my daughters can’t see, of course! The configuration itself wasn’t problem in router! But when I go to use NetBSD and I try to access a site which should not be allowed, it is accessed! What’s am I error and how can I fix?
I use a cable for connect Internet in NetBSD!

Pullup 8 [pullup-8 #1959] Fix for loading viac7temp(4) module
Pullup 9 [pullup-9 #1835] Fix for loading viac7temp(4) module
Pullup pkgsrc [pullup-pkgsrc #6849] pullup-request: lang/php81
Pullup pkgsrc [pullup-pkgsrc #6848] pullup-request: lang/php83
Pullup pkgsrc [pullup-pkgsrc #6847] pullup-request: lang/php82

April 12, 2024

Stack Overflow NetBSD driver: flags always true for memory pages

I am trying to write a driver for NetBSD that will reserve 10 pages of virtual memory, then provide the first 5 pages with physical addresses. At the end, I output the page number, its physical address, and flags such as Valid, User and Modified. However, it seems to me that the flags are not working correctly, since for all pages, all flags have the same value, which is 1 (true). Please help me figure out what I'm doing wrong.

#include <sys/cdefs.h>
#include <sys/module.h>
#include <sys/param.h>
#include <sys/sysctl.h>
#include <uvm/uvm.h>

MODULE(MODULE_CLASS_MISC, driver, NULL);
#define PAGESIZE 0x1000
extern paddr_t avail_end;
vaddr_t va;
struct pglist plist;
static int lab4_modcmd(modcmd_t cmd, void* arg) {
   va = uvm_km_alloc(kernel_map, PAGESIZE*10, 0, UVM_KMF_VAONLY);
   if (va == 0) {
      return 0;
   }
   int error = uvm_pglistalloc(PAGESIZE*5, 0, avail_end, 0, 0, &plist, 5, 0);
   if (!error) printf ("LAB4 loaded\n");
   struct vm_page *page = TAILQ_FIRST(&plist);
   for(int i = 0; page; i++) {
      pd_entry_t *ppte;
      ppte = L2_BASE+pl2_i(va+PAGESIZE*i);
      paddr_t pa = VM_PAGE_TO_PHYS(page);
      printf("Page - %d\n", i+1);
      printf("Valid - %d\n", ((*ppte & PG_V) ? 1 : 0));
      printf("Used - %d\n", ((*ppte & PG_U) ? 1 : 0));
      printf("Modified - %d\n", ((*ppte & PG_M) ? 1 : 0));
      printf("Physical address - 0x%lx\n", pa);
      printf("\n");
      page = TAILQ_NEXT(page, pageq.queue);
   }
   uvm_pglistfree(&plist);
   uvm_km_free(kernel_map, va, PAGESIZE*10, UVM_KMF_VAONLY);
   return 0;
}

I tried to look for other examples where these flags are used.


April 11, 2024

Pullup pkgsrc [pullup-pkgsrc #6846] [[email protected]: CVS commit: pkgsrc/net/mirror]
UnitedBSD Articles about NetBSD in Russian language

Hi to All! On links:

https://netbsd.stupin.su/
https://stupin.su/wiki/

You can find the articles about NetBSD and other OS in Russian language. You can use online translator to translate them to your language.

Author: Vladimir Stupin, Ufa city, Russia: https://stupin.su/files/vladimir_stupin.html


April 10, 2024

Ruben Schade Importing worlds on a multiworld Minecraft server

It’s funny that I field almost as many sysadmin questions about Minecraft than I do BSDs thesedays. Even Minecraft on BSD! This post addresses the most common question after running Minecraft on FreeBSD, and on NetBSD. I’ll assume here that you have a functional server, and know how it works.

Say you have a map running on your local Java Minecraft install, and you want to import it as another into a Java multiworld server running Paper (as I recommend), such as one running MyWorlds or Multiverse. How do you do this?

The pixelart section of our primary Minecraft world showing the RUNBSD sign!

Locating your Minecraft data directory

First, access your saved local world in the appropriate location:

Within this folder, you’ll have a folder called world. This contains your world data, along with subfolders for the associated Nether (DIM-1) and End (DIM1) worlds. These are generated when you first create the world, even if you’ve never accessed them:

Importing without mutliworld, and some context

Importing is easy on a Minecraft server without multiworlds. You copy the world folder into the Minecraft server folder before starting the server, then run. If you’re importing into an existing server, you’ll want to backup and move the existing world folder elsewhere first before replacing it, unless you don’t need it anymore.

You’ll notice that after importing, the server has rearranged the worlds into their own folders in the server directory:

This works, but what if you use a multiworld plugin and want a custom folder name for this world?

Importing with a multiworld plugin

It’s important to note that the Minecraft server will only import world folders. If your imported world is called something like resourceserver, it won’t import the Nether or End worlds automatically. This might not matter to you, but you’ll end up teleporting to your server’s default Nether or End, not the ones you expected.

The temptation is to rename DIM-1 to world_nether, and DIM1 to world_the_end, as several forum posters and AI-generated guides suggest. This doesn’t work, because the other two worlds are missing metadata. Thanks GPT, you monumental waste of resources!

The solution I’ve found is to temporarily rename the imported world as world, let the server import it, then rename it to what you wanted. In more detail:

  1. Stop the Minecraft server, and temporarily rename the existing server world folder to something else, like world_backup.

  2. Copy your local imported world folder into the server, leaving the name of the folder set as world.

  3. Start the Minecraft server, letting it rearrange the folders into world, world_nether, and world_the_end, then generate the required metadata for each.

  4. Stop the Minecraft server again, then rename the folders to what you want, such as resourceserver, resourceserver_nether, and resourceserver_the_end.

  5. Rename your original world_backup back to world again, assuming you want this to be the default.

  6. Start the Minecraft server again, and import your world.

Importing the world, and its attached Nether and End

If you use MyWorlds like I do, you can now import the worlds from the game with these:

/myworlds load resourceserver
/myworlds load resourceserver_nether
/myworlds load resourceserver_the_end

Donezo.

By Ruben Schade in Sydney, 2024-04-11.


April 08, 2024

OS News SmolBSD: make your own BSD UNIX MicroVM

SmolBSD is a tiny BSD UNIX (NetBSD) system creation tool, primarily aimed at building modern, lightweight, fast micro VMs. SmolBSD can start a service in (way) under a second, giving it the ability to be used as a virtualized container, thus reducing attack surface and actually isolating workflows.

↫ SmolBSD website

Neat.


April 05, 2024

Pullup 9 [pullup-9 #1834] sparc64: Enable building zfs by default (PR 55937)

April 04, 2024

Pullup 8 [pullup-8 #1958] who(1): Fix utmpentry counting (PR 56013)
Pullup 9 [pullup-9 #1833] who(1): Fix utmpentry counting (PR 56013)
Pullup 8 [pullup-8 #1957] grep(1): Don't read FIFOs with -D skip (PR 56584)
Pullup 9 [pullup-9 #1832] grep(1): Don't read FIFOs with -D skip (PR 56584)
Pullup 8 [pullup-8 #1956] amd(8): Fix crash in amq -i (PR 56974)
Pullup 9 [pullup-9 #1831] amd(8): Fix crash in amq -i (PR 56974)
Pullup 8 [pullup-8 #1955] evbarm/sshramdisk: Put firmware files in the right place (PR 58035)

April 02, 2024

Amitai Schlair pkgsrc on macOS: still works

A few weeks ago, Apple released new versions of Xcode and Command Line Tools. Not thinking too hard about how my pkgsrc developer environment often gets broken by OS or tool updates, I updated promptly. For one thing, I’m kinda used to it. For another, it doesn’t usually break. For a third thing, managing dependencies — anything not my code that can break my code — means responsibility for dealing with the inevitable trouble, and therefore the sooner I find it the better. (More on my approach to life with dependencies.)

A vendor-provided toolchain is a significant dependency. So I accepted the Command Line Tools update, and it commandeered my spare time for two weeks as I hurried carefully to repair one of the world’s biggest continuous-integration cauldrons on one of its most popular platforms. When I ran my usual pkg_rolling-replace -suv to rebuild anything outdated, it did not go well at all.

This article uses “we” because the continued smooth operation of pkgsrc on macOS reflects the contributions of many developers on many occasions, including this one: I happened to be first on the scene, but several of us of were discussing the problems and potential workarounds and all of “my” commits were adjusted accordingly.

Did I mention that a few weeks ago we were aiming to stabilize for yesterday’s quarterly release? Suddenly, if we didn’t scramble to straighten things out for macOS users, we’d have to manage a complicated situation for a while. But if we created a mess on other platforms by moving rashly, that’d be even worse.

The usual feedback mechanism for proposed infrastructure changes is to compare full bulk builds before and after. There was no time for that.

Happily, the conclusion of the story is boring: as always, the pkgsrc 2024Q1 stable branch supports macOS and its developer tools, including the latest releases of each. (So does -current pkgsrc, of course, if that’s your thing.)

Curious what we had to do to keep it boring? Read on.

Stricter clang defaults

Upstream Clang 16 and GCC 14 have promoted several warnings to errors by default, and Apple’s Clang 15 has followed suit. (Gentoo has very helpfully documented this for packagers.) These changes are intentional and well-intentioned, pushing maintainers to ship more reliable code. But pkgsrc’s job is to build nearly 30,000 codebases we don’t maintain. And stricter compiler defaults break a lot of builds.

As you might hope, we can make the breakage go away in one place.

In pkgsrc, packages declare which programming languages are required for their build. The compiler framework then selects package-and-platform-appropriate compilers, places them preferentially in the package’s build environment, and — crucially — intercepts compiler invocations and rewrites them for a variety of purposes.

When we look into pkgsrc’s clang logic, we find prior art for this specific class of problem. In September 2020, Xcode 12 (and its associated Command Line Tools) arrived even later in our quarterly schedule and promoted -Wimplicit-function-declaration to an error. The surgical fix: on macOS only, if invoking clang reveals the new stricter default, we pass -Wno-error=implicit-function-declaration to demote the error back to a warning.

Apple Clang 15’s new strictures aren’t observable in the same way, so we adjust our workaround: if clang doesn’t complain when we try demoting the new errors back to warnings, we pass those arguments too, via the same compiler-framework mechanism.

Missing m4 and yacc

This messy regression found only in the Command Line Tools 15.3.0.0.1.1708646388 update — not in the corresponding full Xcode 15.3 (build 15E204a) update — must have been unintended.

On macOS, some of the familiar Unix tools in /usr/bin are in fact stubs. When invoked, they either execute into the corresponding installed program (living somewhere under /Library/Developer) or prompt the user to install the Command Line Tools.

This Command Line Tools update uninstalls m4 and yacc from /Library/Developer. But since the OS-provided /usr/bin/m4 and /usr/bin/yacc stubs still exist, running m4 or yacc still does something: it pops up a window prompting you to reinstall the CLT. Unfortunately, as the latest available version doesn’t provide those tools, reinstalling is a waste of time.

As you might once again hope, we can hide the problem without personally visiting 29,000+ packages.

In pkgsrc, we also have a framework to control which non-compiler tools are invoked during builds. Packages declare which tools are required for their build. The tools framework then selects package-and-platform-appropriate incarnations of the declared tools and places them preferentially in the package’s build environment.

We just got handed a few new twists to handle in the framework, is all.

First, because this clever new CLT failure mode outfoxes our usual tool-detection mechanism, we special-case m4 and yacc detection on macOS, performing an existence check for the stubs’ targets. Then the selection mechanism’s usual fallback logic can provide them some other way. This prevents the primary source of needless CLT install popups. For non-macOS platforms, no change.

Second, because some packages might not yet be declaring all their tool dependencies, we special-case m4 and yacc handling on macOS: when they’re not declared, we place them in the build environment anyway, as no-ops. If the package build happens to invoke them, nothing happens. This prevents the secondary source of needless CLT install popups, at the risk of breaking macOS builds for packages that are missing these tool declarations and have heretofore gotten lucky; in such cases, the breakage will be obvious and the fix easy. For non-macOS platforms, no change. (At leisure, we might like to broaden this approach to help find and fix all undeclared tools on all platforms.)

Third, because the flex tool expects to invoke a GNU-compatible m4, we adjust the tools framework to infer gm4 from a flex declaration so that the framework controls which m4 gets found. This more correctly expresses our intent on all platforms, and in the macOS package build environment it restores /usr/bin/flex to a working state.

Broader xcrun search

We were already relying on xcrun for a couple of things, so when our new tool-detection special cases were sometimes getting surprising results from it, that was concerning. Turns out xcrun no longer looks solely in Apple-controlled locations, but also consults the environment’s $PATH. By invoking xcrun with an empty PATH and --no-cache, we obtain controlled, predictable tool detection.

Conclusion

Under the constraints, we changed as little as possible, as safely as possible, as similarly as possible to previous proven changes, avoiding novel constructs or any whiff of unforeseen consequences. We could not have done nearly as safe or thorough a job without good abstractions already in place. Total lines of pkgsrc infrastructure code changed: less than 100. Now that 2024Q1 is out, we have room to refactor.

These 15.3 updates also include a brand new linker. So far it hasn’t given us any trouble. If that changes, wanna guess whether we have one place to take care of it?


April 01, 2024

OS News GCC 10 ported to QNX 6.5 SP1

Way back in the day, back when I wasn’t even working at OSNews yet, I used to run QNX as my desktop operating system, together with a small number of other enthusiasts. It was a struggle, for sure, but it was fun, exciting, and nobody else was crazy enough to do so. Sadly, the small QNX desktop community wasn’t even remotely interesting to QNX, and later Blackberry when they acquired the company, and eventually the stand-alone Neutrino-powered version of QNX disappeared behind confusing signup screens and other dark patterns. It meant the end of our small little community.

Much to my utter surprise and delight, I saw a post by js about how he ported GCC 10 to QNX – in this case, to QNX 6.5 SP1, released in 2012 – and submitted it to pkgsrc. His ultimate goal is to port one of his other projects, ObjFW, to QNX. He makes use of pkgsrc to do this kind of work, which also means he had to make pkgsrc bootstrap and a lot of other software work on QNX.

We’re at QNX 8.0 by now, and as much as I bang my head against QNX and BlackBerry’s wall of marketing and corporate speak, I just can’t find out if it’s even still possible to download QNX Neutrino and install it on real generic hardware today.


March 31, 2024

Frederic Cambus Toolchains adventures - Q1 2024

This is the ninth post in my toolchains adventures series. Please check the previous posts in the toolchains category for more context about this journey. There was no Q4 2023 report as there wasn't really anything worthwhile to write about.

I've been taking a break from Pkgsrc to only focus on OpenBSD at this point, for which I updated binutils to version 2.42 in the ports tree.

During this OpenBSD release cycle, the remaining parts required to get pinsyscalls(2) working have been committed, and I added support upstream for the PT_OPENBSD_SYSCALLS segment type to readelf in GNU Binutils, as well as in LLVM versions of objdump and readobj.

Lastly, I also wrote a blog post about Speedbuilding LLVM/Clang in 3 minutes on Power10.

As usual, I’ve also been busy reading different material, and adding new resources to toolchains.net.

binutils commits:

2024-02-12d86205cAdd support to readelf for the PT_OPENBSD_SYSCALLS segment type

LLVM commits

2024-02-20a8d7511[llvm-readobj] Add support for the PT_OPENBSD_SYSCALLS segment type
2024-02-201b89486[llvm-objdump] Add support for the PT_OPENBSD_SYSCALLS segment type
2024-02-1797eff26[Support/ELF] Add OpenBSD PT_OPENBSD_SYSCALLS constant
2024-02-10d2e4a72[clang] Update Clang version from 18 to 19 in scan-build.1

March 30, 2024

OS News NetBSD 10.0 released

NetBSD 10.0 has been released, and it brings a lot of improvements, new features, and fixes compared to the previous release, 9.3. First and foremost, there are massive performance improvements when it comes to compute and filesystem-bound applications on multicore and multiprocessor systems. NetBSD 10.0 also brings WireGuard support compatible with implementations on other systems, although this is still experimental.

There’s also a lot of added support for various ARM SoCs and boards, including Apple’s M1 chip, and there’s new support for compat_linux on AArch64, for running Linux programs. Of course, there’s also a ton of new and updated drivers, notably the graphics drivers which are now synced to Linux 5.6, bringing a ton of improvements with them.

This is just a small sliver of all the changes, so be sure to read the entire release announcement for everything else.

NetBSD Blog NetBSD 10.0 available!

The NetBSD project is pleased to announce the eighteenth major release of the NetBSD operating system NetBSD 10.0!
See the release announcement for details.

The netbsd-10 release branch is more than a year old now, so it is high time the 10.0 release makes it to the front stage. This matches the long time it took for the development branch to get ready for branching, a lot of development went into this new release.

This also caused the release announcement to be one of the longest we ever did.

If you want to try NetBSD 10.0 please check the installation notes for your architecture and download the preferred install image from the CDN or if you are using an ARM based device from the netbsd-10 builds from the bootable ARM images page.

If you have any issues with installation or run into issues with the system during use, please contact us on one of the mailing lists or file a problem report.

NetBSD Blog Statement on backdoor in xz library

Recently, a backdoor was discovered in the xz compression library. xz/liblzma are included as a part of NetBSD and used by the project for distribution of new releases and packages.

The version of xz shipped in all stable (and unstable) versions of NetBSD predates any code changes by the author of the backdoor. NetBSD is therefore safe and unaffected by the recent discoveries. It is believed that the attack only targets Linux/glibc, but checking this allowed us to rule out any other attempts at compromising the library by the author.

The version of xz shipped in pkgsrc, however, is affected. Using xz from pkgsrc is a non-default setting on NetBSD, and requires explicit opt-in. Most users of NetBSD will not install xz from pkgsrc because the version from the base system is preferred. However, users of pkgsrc on other platforms will need to take precautions.

Regardless of NetBSD being affected or not, the discovery of the backdoor is a wake-up call and further discussion will be happening internally over how to proceed.


March 28, 2024

NetBSD Installation and Upgrading on DaemonForums NetBSD on Synology 107+
Greetings to the whole group.
I am a systems enthusiast, I use linux for several years in an exclusive way.
I’m trying to learn (never ends) with a little difficulty with the English language... so you’ll forgive me if I use a translator...

I am currently working on a synology 107+ that I have been doing for many years... I have put it back doing some hardware maintenance.
the problem was triggered when I realized that the official website was no longer available firmware for my model....
searching on the internet an alternative I came to NetBSD...
I followed this quida:
https://wiki.netbsd.org/ports/sandpoint/instsynology/

but my limitations arose when I failed to boot altboot.bin via TFTP....
I hope to find among you some advice and some tips to get ahead of this issue... and clearly increase personal knowledge...
I attach a bit of info in the following post...
thanks

Giuseppe
The NetBSD Foundation NetBSD 10.0 is available!

March 21, 2024

Ruben Schade NetBSD 10 Release Candidate 6

A sixth Release Candidate of my other favourite OS was made available on the 12th of March. From the NetBSD blog:

RC6 fixes a few issues with the new named/bind imported for RC5 plus several minor issues.

If you want to test 10.0 RC6 please check the installation notes for your architecture and download the preferred install image from the CDN or if you are using an ARM based device from the netbsd-10 builds from the bootable ARM images page.

If you have any issues with installation or run into issues with the system during use, please contact us on one of the mailing lists or file a problem report.

This is old news for the NetBSD community, but I mentioned that I’d been testing RC5 last month, so I felt like I should pass this on.

By Ruben Schade in Sydney, 2024-03-22.


March 19, 2024

Unix Stack Exchange NetBSD - how to display information about kernel memory in GDB?

I'm debugging the NetBSD kernel with gdb, but I would like to be able to display information about the memory region an address is in. I'm mainly interested in finding out the permissions of a page of memory, along with the size of the region it is enclosed in (if the latter part of that question makes sense).

Does the kernel have a concept of memory regions in kernel space? i.e. a contiguous block of pages (virtual addresses) reserved for a specific purpose (which is kept track of somewhere)? Or is it down to each specific module to keep track of which blocks of memory belong to a logical group?

Here's an example of what I'm looking for:

(gdb) addressinfo 0xffffffff80e1000

                Start                End    Offset    Perm     Size
    0xffffffff80e0000  0xffffffff80e2000    0x1000    r--p     0x2000   

I don't mind adding a hook to the kernel for a GDB script to output this information, if this functionality does not exist. At the minimum it would be useful to add a hook for GDB scripts to view the page permissions.


March 17, 2024

DragonFly BSD Digest Lazy Reading for 2024/03/17

Command line / history is I guess the mini-theme.

Ruben Schade Finally got my ultimate retro KVM setup working!

It took almost a year of tinkering, buying parts, testing, configuring, fixing, cursing, and shouting with excitement, but I now have a KVM setup that finally works, across two decades of computer history from a Commodore VC-20 to a Dell Dimension Pentium III!

We start with this assortment of parts to take signals and convert them to VGA for my KVM, inspected for quality by one of Clara’s Prince Cats. Some of these ended up being replaced or not used.

Photo showing the parts listed below.

Clokwise from left to right we have:

  1. The RetroTINK-2X-Pro, with a Belkin HDMI to VGA adaptor. This box of wonders converts and upscales the S-Video from my 8-bit Commodore machines with zero configuration and fuss. The Belkin converts this to a crisp VGA signal for the KVM.

  2. A DB13W3 connector. This converts the Sun TurboXGX frame buffer card on my Sun SPARCStation 5 to VGA.

  3. The GGLabs CGAtoRGBv2. This converts the EGA signal from my Am386 tower to 15 KHz VGA, which surprisingly my VGA LCD accepts. It might also work with my Commodore 128’s 80-column mode eventually, if I get its VDC working.

  4. A cheap S-Video and Composite to VGA converter (retired). I used this with the Apple //e before I got the ∀2 Analog VGA card. It was fine.

  5. Luis Antoniosi’s MCEtoVGA converter (retired). Worked fine for EGA, but the GGLabs card has no artefacting or fuzziness.

  6. The ∀2 Analog (not pictured). This card generates a VGA signal from any slot on an Apple ][, including my //e Platinum. 80 column colour is not only feasible on this machine now, but it looks stunning!

The next piece was my handsome beige KVM, which I got on eBay for a steal because it had no cables; something I later came to regret! But I finally have cables now.

Photo showing the Master View KVM switch above the NEC APEX 486.

With these connectors, we now have the KVM ports set up like this:

  1. Am386 EGA → CGAtoRGBv2 → VGA
  2. NEC APEX 486 DX2 → VGA
  3. DIY childhood P1 → VGA
  4. Dell Dimension 4100 P3 → VGA
  5. Sun SPARCStation 5 → DV13W3 adaptor → VGA
  6. 8-bit Commodores → RetroTINK → HDMI → VGA
  7. Apple //e Platinum → ∀2 Analog → VGA
  8. Reserved for another upstream KVM? Gulp

And it works! I can press the button on the KVM, or invoke a key command, and jump between DOS 3.3 on my Apple //e, to NetBSD on the SPARCStation, then across to GEM on the 386, then check where my BNSF GP38-2 is up to in Train Simulator on my Dell.

It’s a hornet nest of cables, and I can’t tell you how happy I am now! Well, I guess I just did! Now it’s time to update Sasara.moe with all this stuff.

The Apple //e later in the evening booting into DOS 3.3 via the V2 Analog card and the KVM.

FAQs

More of Clara's Prince Cats inspecting the VC-20.

By Ruben Schade in Sydney, 2024-03-17.

Ruben Schade Finally got my ultimate retro KVM setup working!

It took almost a year of tinkering, buying parts, testing, configuring, fixing, cursing, and shouting with excitement, but I now have a KVM setup that finally works, across two decades of computer history from a Commodore VC-20 to a Dell Dimension Pentium III!

We start with this assortment of parts to take signals and convert them to VGA for my KVM, inspected for quality by one of Clara’s Prince Cats. Some of these ended up being replaced or not used.

Photo showing the parts listed below.

Clokwise from left to right we have:

  1. The RetroTINK-2X-Pro, with a Belkin HDMI to VGA adaptor. This box of wonders converts and upscales the S-Video from my 8-bit Commodore machines with zero configuration and fuss. The Belkin converts this to a crisp VGA signal for the KVM.

  2. A DB13W3 connector. This converts the Sun TurboXGX frame buffer card on my Sun SPARCStation 5 to VGA.

  3. The GGLabs CGAtoRGBv2. This converts the EGA signal from my Am386 tower to 15 KHz VGA, which surprisingly my VGA LCD accepts. It might also work with my Commodore 128’s 80-column mode eventually, if I get its VDC working.

  4. A cheap S-Video and Composite to VGA converter (retired). I used this with the Apple //e before I got the ∀2 Analog VGA card. It was fine.

  5. Luis Antoniosi’s MCEtoVGA converter (retired). Worked fine for EGA, but the GGLabs card has no artefacting or fuzziness.

  6. The ∀2 Analog (not pictured). This card generates a VGA signal from any slot on an Apple ][, including my //e Platinum. 80 column colour is not only feasible on this machine now, but it looks stunning!

The next piece was my handsome beige KVM, which I got on eBay for a steal because it had no cables; something I later came to regret! But I finally have cables now.

Photo showing the Master View KVM switch above the NEC APEX 486.

With these connectors, we now have the KVM ports set up like this:

  1. Am386 EGA → CGAtoRGBv2 → VGA
  2. NEC APEX 486 DX2 → VGA
  3. DIY childhood P1 → VGA
  4. Dell Dimension 4100 P3 → VGA
  5. Sun SPARCStation 5 → DV13W3 adaptor → VGA
  6. 8-bit Commodores → RetroTINK → HDMI → VGA
  7. Apple //e Platinum → ∀2 Analog → VGA
  8. Reserved for another upstream KVM? Gulp

And it works! I can press the button on the KVM, or invoke a key command, and jump between DOS 3.3 on my Apple //e, to NetBSD on the SPARCStation, then across to GEM on the 386, then check where my BNSF GP38-2 is up to in Train Simulator on my Dell.

It’s a hornet nest of cables, and I can’t tell you how happy I am now! Well, I guess I just did! Now it’s time to update Sasara.moe with all this stuff.

The Apple //e later in the evening booting into DOS 3.3 via the V2 Analog card and the KVM.

FAQs

More of Clara's Prince Cats inspecting the VC-20.

By Ruben Schade in Sydney, 2024-03-17.


March 13, 2024

NetBSD Blog NetBSD 10.0 RC6 available!

The NetBSD project is pleased to announce the sixth release candidate of the upcoming 10.0 release, please help testing!
See the release announcement for details.

The netbsd-10 release branch is more than a year old now, so it is high time the 10.0 release makes it to the front stage. This matches the long time it took for the development branch to get ready for branching, a lot of development went into this new release.

This also caused the release announcement to be one of the longest we ever did.

Since RC1 there have been numerous changes, including major updates to external software included in the release: Postfix, OpenSSH, and the firmware used for Raspberry PI devices. Various issues with RC1 have been fixed, including installer (sysinst) crashes. Lots of architecture specific fixes happend, e.g. various toolchain changes for VAX (so it is now finaly self-hosting again), and kernel changes for macppc, netwinder, and alpha.

For RC3 only few (relatively) minor changes were made, including https certificate verification in libfetch (which is used by pkg_ad(1)), and also improvements to the EFI bootloader to better deal with booting from CD (or in virtual machines ISO images), plus lots of various bug fixes.

RC4 became necessary as a few very important DRM/KMS issues especially for Intel GPUs have been resolved. And as an (unexpected) bonus support for the Nintendo Wii has been added to the evbppc port.

RC5 has a few important security related updates of third party components (named, nsd, unbound, wpa_supplicant).

RC6 fixes a few issues with the new named/bind imported for RC5 plus several minor issues.

Especially on amd64 machines please notes that we got a new DRM/KMS subsystem version, and this may lead to fallout on some hardware. Unfortunately not all known bugs from the release engineering pre-release task list could be fixed in time for this release - we will continue to improve the current state and hope to have more of them solved for the next (10.1) release.

If you want to test 10.0 RC6 please check the installation notes for your architecture and download the preferred install image from the CDN or if you are using an ARM based device from the netbsd-10 builds from the bootable ARM images page.

If you have any issues with installation or run into issues with the system during use, please contact us on one of the mailing lists or file a problem report.


March 12, 2024

The NetBSD Foundation NetBSD 10.0 RC6 is available!

March 10, 2024

The NetBSD Foundation One New Security Advisory: NetBSD-SA2024-001

March 04, 2024

DragonFly BSD Digest March 6 NYCBUG meeting

The March 6 NYCBUG meeting is coming up, and it sounds like something I’d want to see: NetBSD for the Advanced Minimalist, working remote using only a $100 Pinebook.  Be sure to RSVP if you can go cause this is in-person and they need to know who is coming into the NYU facility.


February 28, 2024

NetBSD Blog NetBSD 10.0 RC5 available!

The NetBSD project is pleased to announce the fifth (and probably last) release candidate of the upcoming 10.0 release, please help testing!
See the release announcement for details.

The netbsd-10 release branch is more than a year old now, so it is high time the 10.0 release makes it to the front stage. This matches the long time it took for the development branch to get ready for branching, a lot of development went into this new release.

This also caused the release announcement to be one of the longest we ever did.

Since RC1 there have been numerous changes, including major updates to external software included in the release: Postfix, OpenSSH, and the firmware used for Raspberry PI devices. Various issues with RC1 have been fixed, including installer (sysinst) crashes. Lots of architecture specific fixes happend, e.g. various toolchain changes for VAX (so it is now finaly self-hosting again), and kernel changes for macppc, netwinder, and alpha.

For RC3 only few (relatively) minor changes were made, including https certificate verification in libfetch (which is used by pkg_ad(1)), and also improvements to the EFI bootloader to better deal with booting from CD (or in virtual machines ISO images), plus lots of various bug fixes.

RC4 became necessary as a few very important DRM/KMS issues especially for Intel GPUs have been resolved. And as an (unexpected) bonus support for the Nintendo Wii has been added to the evbppc port.

RC5 has a few important security related updates of third party components (named, nsd, unbound, wpa_supplicant).

Especially on amd64 machines please notes that we got a new DRM/KMS subsystem version, and this may lead to fallout on some hardware. Unfortunately not all known bugs from the release engineering pre-release task list could be fixed in time for this release - we will continue to improve the current state and hope to have more of them solved for the next (10.1) release.

If you want to test 10.0 RC5 please check the installation notes for your architecture and download the preferred install image from the CDN or if you are using an ARM based device from the netbsd-10 builds from the bootable ARM images page.

If you have any issues with installation or run into issues with the system during use, please contact us on one of the mailing lists or file a problem report.


February 27, 2024

The NetBSD Foundation NetBSD 10.0 RC5 is available!

February 25, 2024

NetBSD Installation and Upgrading on DaemonForums NetBSD 10 RC_4 experiences
A few days ago I installed the 4th release candidate of NetBSD on a 32 GB USB 3.0 memory stick.

Install went well and fast. After booting up I installed the Firefox compiled package with pkgin This also went smooth.

I did not have to do anything for the X configuration. But when I started firefox the system became unresponsive (crashed) and seemed to be busy writing a dump file.
Sometimes OpenBSD also shows the same behaviour on this system. Powering off is the only way to regain control.

The system I used is my grumpy HP Proliant server. Linux, FreeBSD and DragonFlyBSD complain that about mixed 32bit and 64bit ACPI data.
The cheap 64bit Xeon CPU has a built-in Matrox VGA processor (mga driver in X Window) and probably uses part of the normal ECC RAM.

NetBSD also mentions problems with the ACPI stuff. It seems to truncate some entries:
The dmesg:
Code:

$ sed -e "s/^\[    /[/" U/dmesg_netbsd10_rc4.txt

[ 1.000000] Copyright (c) 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003,
[ 1.000000]    2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013,
[ 1.000000]    2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021, 2022, 2023,
[ 1.000000]    2024
[ 1.000000]    The NetBSD Foundation, Inc.  All rights reserved.
[ 1.000000] Copyright (c) 1982, 1986, 1989, 1991, 1993
[ 1.000000]    The Regents of the University of California.  All rights reserved.

[ 1.000000] NetBSD 10.0_RC4 (GENERIC) #0: Tue Feb  6 12:38:53 UTC 2024
[ 1.000000]    [email protected]:/usr/src/sys/arch/amd64/compile/GENERIC
[ 1.000000] total memory = 4061 MB
[ 1.000000] avail memory = 3902 MB
[ 1.000000] timecounter: Timecounters tick every 10.000 msec
[ 1.000000] Kernelized RAIDframe activated
[ 1.000000] timecounter: Timecounter "i8254" frequency 1193182 Hz quality 100
[ 1.000004] mainbus0 (root)
[ 1.000004] ACPI: RSDP 0x00000000000F4F00 000024 (v02 HP    )
[ 1.000004] ACPI: XSDT 0x00000000F1DE6400 0000B4 (v01 HP    ProLiant 00000002 ??  0000162E)
[ 1.000004] ACPI: FACP 0x00000000F1DE6540 0000F4 (v03 HP    ProLiant 00000002 ??  0000162E)
[ 1.000004] Firmware Warning (ACPI): 32/64X length mismatch in FADT/Pm1aControlBlock: 16/32 (20221020/tbfadt-640)
[ 1.000004] Firmware Warning (ACPI): 32/64X length mismatch in FADT/Pm2ControlBlock: 8/32 (20221020/tbfadt-640)
[ 1.000004] Firmware Warning (ACPI): Invalid length for FADT/Pm1aControlBlock: 32, using default 16 (20221020/tbfa
dt-742)
[ 1.000004] Firmware Warning (ACPI): Invalid length for FADT/Pm2ControlBlock: 32, using default 8 (20221020/tbfadt
-742)

[ 1.000004] ACPI: DSDT 0x00000000F1DE6640 002A13 (v01 HP    DSDT    00000001 INTL 20030228)
[ 1.000004] ACPI: FACS 0x00000000F1DE4140 000040
[ 1.000004] ACPI: SPCR 0x00000000F1DE4180 000050 (v01 HP    SPCRRBSU 00000001 ??  0000162E)
[ 1.000004] ACPI: MCFG 0x00000000F1DE4200 00003C (v01 HP    ProLiant 00000001      00000000)
[ 1.000004] ACPI: HPET 0x00000000F1DE4240 000038 (v01 HP    ProLiant 00000002 ??  0000162E)
[ 1.000004] ACPI: FFFF 0x00000000F1DE4280 000064 (v02 HP    ProLiant 00000002 ??  0000162E)
[ 1.000004] ACPI: SPMI 0x00000000F1DE4300 000040 (v05 HP    ProLiant 00000001 ??  0000162E)
[ 1.000004] ACPI: ERST 0x00000000F1DE4340 000230 (v01 HP    ProLiant 00000001 ??  0000162E)
[ 1.000004] ACPI: APIC 0x00000000F1DE4580 000252 (v01 HP    ProLiant 00000002      00000000)
[ 1.000004] ACPI: FFFF 0x00000000F1DE4800 000176 (v01 HP    ProLiant 00000001 ??  0000162E)
[ 1.000004] ACPI: BERT 0x00000000F1DE4980 000030 (v01 HP    ProLiant 00000001 ??  0000162E)
[ 1.000004] ACPI: HEST 0x00000000F1DE49C0 0000BC (v01 HP    ProLiant 00000001 ??  0000162E)
[ 1.000004] ACPI: DMAR 0x00000000F1DE4A80 00030E (v01 HP    ProLiant 00000001 ??  0000162E)
[ 1.000004] ACPI: FFFF 0x00000000F1DE63C0 00002D (v01 HP    ProLiant 00000001      00000000)
[ 1.000004] ACPI: SSDT 0x00000000F1DE9080 000137 (v03 HP    CRSPCI0  00000002 HP  00000001)
[ 1.000004] ACPI: SSDT 0x00000000F1DE91C0 000573 (v03 HP    riser0  00000002 INTL 20030228)
[ 1.000004] ACPI: SSDT 0x00000000F1DE9740 0001E1 (v01 HP    pcc      00000001 INTL 20090625)
[ 1.000004] ACPI: SSDT 0x00000000F1DE9940 000377 (v01 HP    pmab    00000001 INTL 20090625)
[ 1.000004] ACPI: SSDT 0x00000000F1DE9CC0 0009E4 (v01 INTEL  PPM RCM  80000001 INTL 20061109)
[ 1.000004] ACPI: 6 ACPI AML tables successfully acquired and loaded
[ 1.000004] ioapic0 at mainbus0 apid 8: pa 0xfec00000, version 0x20, 24 pins
[ 1.000004] x2APIC available but disabled by DMAR table
[ 1.000004] cpu0 at mainbus0 apid 0
[ 1.000004] cpu0: Use lfence to serialize rdtsc
[ 1.000004] cpu0: Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E3-1220 v3 @ 3.10GHz, id 0x306c3
[ 1.000004] cpu0: node 0, package 0, core 0, smt 0
[ 1.000004] cpu1 at mainbus0 apid 2
[ 1.000004] cpu1: Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E3-1220 v3 @ 3.10GHz, id 0x306c3
[ 1.000004] cpu1: node 0, package 0, core 1, smt 0
[ 1.000004] cpu2 at mainbus0 apid 4
[ 1.000004] cpu2: Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E3-1220 v3 @ 3.10GHz, id 0x306c3
[ 1.000004] cpu2: node 0, package 0, core 2, smt 0
[ 1.000004] cpu3 at mainbus0 apid 6
[ 1.000004] cpu3: Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E3-1220 v3 @ 3.10GHz, id 0x306c3
[ 1.000004] cpu3: node 0, package 0, core 3, smt 0
[ 1.000004] acpi0 at mainbus0: Intel ACPICA 20221020
[ 1.000004] acpi0: X/RSDT: OemId <HP    ,ProLiant,00000002>, AslId <  <2147483602>^D,0000162e>
[ 1.000004] acpi0: MCFG: segment 0, bus 0-63, address 0x00000000f4000000
[ 1.000004] acpi0: SCI interrupting at int 9
[ 1.000004] acpi0: fixed power button present
[ 1.000004] timecounter: Timecounter "ACPI-Fast" frequency 3579545 Hz quality 1000
[ 1.021219] hpet0 at acpi0: high precision event timer (mem 0xfed00000-0xfed00400)
[ 1.021219] timecounter: Timecounter "hpet0" frequency 14318180 Hz quality 2000
[ 1.021431] ipmi_acpi0 at acpi0 (MI0, IPI0001-0): io 0xca2-0xca3
[ 1.021431] ipmi0 at ipmi_acpi0
[ 1.021431] attimer1 at acpi0 (TIME, PNP0100): io 0x40-0x43 irq 0
[ 1.021431] pcppi1 at acpi0 (BEEP, PNP0800): io 0x61
[ 1.021431] spkr0 at pcppi1: PC Speaker
[ 1.021431] wsbell at spkr0 not configured
[ 1.021431] midi0 at pcppi1: PC speaker
[ 1.021431] sysbeep0 at pcppi1
[ 1.021431] com0 at acpi0 (COMA, PNP0501-0): io 0x3f8-0x3ff irq 4
[ 1.021431] com0: ns16550a, 16-byte FIFO
[ 1.021431] pckbc1 at acpi0 (KBD, PNP0303) (kbd port): io 0x60,0x64 irq 1
[ 1.021431] pckbc2 at acpi0 (PS2M, PNP0F13) (aux port): irq 12
[ 1.021431] PMI0 (ACPI000D) at acpi0 not configured
[ 1.021431] acpitz0 at acpi0 (THM0): cpu0
[ 1.021431] acpitz0: levels: critical 31.3 C, passive 9.8 C, passive cooling
[ 1.021431] attimer1: attached to pcppi1
[ 1.021431] pckbd0 at pckbc1 (kbd slot)
[ 1.021431] pckbc1: using irq 1 for kbd slot
[ 1.021431] wskbd0 at pckbd0: console keyboard
[ 1.021431] pms0 at pckbc1 (aux slot)
[ 1.021431] pckbc1: using irq 12 for aux slot
[ 1.021431] wsmouse0 at pms0 mux 0
[ 1.021431] pci0 at mainbus0 bus 0: configuration mode 1
[ 1.021431] pci0: i/o space, memory space enabled, rd/line, rd/mult, wr/inv ok
[ 1.021431] pchb0 at pci0 dev 0 function 0: Intel Xeon E3-1200 v3 Host Bridge, DRAM (rev. 0x06)
[ 1.021431] ppb0 at pci0 dev 1 function 0: Intel Haswell PCI-E x16 Controller (rev. 0x06)
[ 1.021431] ppb0: PCI Express capability version 2 <Root Port of PCI-E Root Complex> x8 @ 8.0GT/s
[ 1.021431] pci1 at ppb0 bus 4
[ 1.021431] pci1: i/o space, memory space enabled, rd/line, wr/inv ok
[ 1.021431] ppb1 at pci0 dev 1 function 1: Intel Haswell PCI-E x8 Controller (rev. 0x06)
[ 1.021431] ppb1: PCI Express capability version 2 <Root Port of PCI-E Root Complex> x8 @ 8.0GT/s
[ 1.021431] pci2 at ppb1 bus 7
[ 1.021431] pci2: i/o space, memory space enabled, rd/line, wr/inv ok
[ 1.021431] xhci0 at pci0 dev 20 function 0: Intel 8 Series USB xHCI (rev. 0x04)
[ 1.021431] xhci0: 64-bit DMA
[ 1.021431] xhci0: interrupting at msi0 vec 0
[ 1.021431] xhci0: xHCI version 1.0
[ 1.021431] usb0 at xhci0: USB revision 3.0
[ 1.021431] usb1 at xhci0: USB revision 2.0
[ 1.021431] ehci0 at pci0 dev 26 function 0: Intel 8 Series USB EHCI (rev. 0x04)
[ 1.021431] ehci0: 64-bit DMA
[ 1.021431] ehci0: interrupting at ioapic0 pin 21
[ 1.021431] ehci0: BIOS has given up ownership
[ 1.021431] ehci0: EHCI version 1.0
[ 1.021431] ehci0: Using DMA subregion for control data structures
[ 1.021431] usb2 at ehci0: USB revision 2.0
[ 1.021431] ppb2 at pci0 dev 28 function 0: Intel 8 Series PCIe (rev. 0xd4)
[ 1.021431] ppb2: PCI Express capability version 2 <Root Port of PCI-E Root Complex> x1 @ 5.0GT/s
[ 1.021431] pci3 at ppb2 bus 10
[ 1.021431] pci3: i/o space, memory space enabled, rd/line, wr/inv ok
[ 1.021431] ppb3 at pci0 dev 28 function 4: Intel 8 Series PCIe (rev. 0xd4)
[ 1.021431] ppb3: PCI Express capability version 2 <Root Port of PCI-E Root Complex> x1 @ 5.0GT/s
[ 1.021431] pci4 at ppb3 bus 2
[ 1.021431] pci4: i/o space, memory space enabled, rd/line, wr/inv ok
[ 1.021431] ppb4 at pci0 dev 28 function 5: Intel 8 Series PCIe (rev. 0xd4)
[ 1.021431] ppb4: PCI Express capability version 2 <Root Port of PCI-E Root Complex> x1 @ 5.0GT/s
[ 1.021431] pci5 at ppb4 bus 3
[ 1.021431] pci5: i/o space, memory space enabled, rd/line, wr/inv ok
[ 1.021431] bge0 at pci5 dev 0 function 0: Broadcom BCM5720 Gigabit Ethernet
[ 1.021431] bge0: APE firmware NCSI 1.1.15.0
[ 1.021431] bge0: interrupting at msix1 vec 0
[ 1.021431] bge0: HW config 002b10d4, 00006014, 0000aa38, 00000000 00000000
[ 1.021431] bge0: ASIC BCM5720 A0 (0x5720000), Ethernet address a0:1d:48:97:5b:74
[ 1.021431] bge0: setting short Tx thresholds
[ 1.021431] brgphy0 at bge0 phy 1: BCM5720C 1000BASE-T media interface, rev. 0
[ 1.021431] brgphy0: 10baseT, 10baseT-FDX, 100baseTX, 100baseTX-FDX, 1000baseT, 1000baseT-FDX, auto
[ 1.021431] bge1 at pci5 dev 0 function 1: Broadcom BCM5720 Gigabit Ethernet
[ 1.021431] bge1: APE firmware NCSI 1.1.15.0
[ 1.021431] bge1: interrupting at msix2 vec 0
[ 1.021431] bge1: HW config 002b10d4, 00006014, 0000aa38, 00000000 00000000
[ 1.021431] bge1: ASIC BCM5720 A0 (0x5720000), Ethernet address a0:1d:48:97:5b:75
[ 1.021431] bge1: setting short Tx thresholds
[ 1.021431] brgphy1 at bge1 phy 2: BCM5720C 1000BASE-T media interface, rev. 0
[ 1.021431] brgphy1: 10baseT, 10baseT-FDX, 100baseTX, 100baseTX-FDX, 1000baseT, 1000baseT-FDX, auto
[ 1.021431] ppb5 at pci0 dev 28 function 6: Intel 8 Series PCIe (rev. 0xd4)
[ 1.021431] ppb5: PCI Express capability version 2 <Root Port of PCI-E Root Complex> x1 @ 5.0GT/s
[ 1.021431] pci6 at ppb5 bus 13
[ 1.021431] pci6: i/o space, memory space enabled, rd/line, wr/inv ok
[ 1.021431] ppb6 at pci0 dev 28 function 7: Intel 8 Series PCIe (rev. 0xd4)
[ 1.021431] ppb6: PCI Express capability version 2 <Root Port of PCI-E Root Complex> x1 @ 5.0GT/s
[ 1.021431] ppb6: link is x1 @ 2.5GT/s
[ 1.021431] pci7 at ppb6 bus 1
[ 1.021431] pci7: i/o space, memory space enabled, rd/line, wr/inv ok
[ 1.021431] Hewlett-Packard iLO3 Slave (miscellaneous system, revision 0x05) at pci7 dev 0 function 0 not configured
[ 1.021431] vga0 at pci7 dev 0 function 1: Matrox MGA G200eH (rev. 0x00)
[ 1.021431] wsdisplay0 at vga0 kbdmux 1: console (80x25, vt100 emulation), using wskbd0
[ 1.021431] wsmux1: connecting to wsdisplay0
[ 1.021431] drm at vga0 not configured
[ 1.021431] Hewlett-Packard iLO3 Management (miscellaneous system, revision 0x05) at pci7 dev 0 function 2 not configured
[ 1.021431] uhci0 at pci7 dev 0 function 4: Hewlett-Packard iLO3 Virtual USB (rev. 0x02)
[ 1.021431] uhci0: interrupting at msi3 vec 0
[ 1.021431] usb3 at uhci0: USB revision 1.0
[ 1.021431] ehci1 at pci0 dev 29 function 0: Intel 8 Series USB EHCI (rev. 0x04)
[ 1.021431] ehci1: 64-bit DMA
[ 1.021431] ehci1: interrupting at ioapic0 pin 20
[ 1.021431] ehci1: BIOS has given up ownership
[ 1.021431] ehci1: EHCI version 1.0
[ 1.021431] ehci1: Using DMA subregion for control data structures
[ 1.021431] usb4 at ehci1: USB revision 2.0
[ 1.021431] ichlpcib0 at pci0 dev 31 function 0: Intel C222 LPC (rev. 0x04)
[ 1.021431] timecounter: Timecounter "ichlpcib0" frequency 3579545 Hz quality 1000
[ 1.021431] ichlpcib0: 24-bit timer
[ 1.021431] tco0 at ichlpcib0: TCO (watchdog) timer configured.
[ 1.021431] tco0: autoconfiguration error: TCO timer reboot disabled by hardware; hope SMBIOS properly handles it.
[ 1.021431] tco0: Min/Max interval 1/367 seconds
[ 1.021431] ahcisata0 at pci0 dev 31 function 2: Intel 8 Series (desktop) SATA Controller (AHCI) (rev. 0x04)
[ 1.021431] ahcisata0: 64-bit DMA
[ 1.021431] ahcisata0: AHCI revision 1.30, 6 ports, 32 slots, CAP 0xdf30ff45<EMS,PSC,SSC,PMD,ISS=0x3=Gen3,SCLO,SAL,SALP,SSS,SMPS,SNCQ,S64A>
[ 1.021431] ahcisata0: interrupting at msi4 vec 0
[ 1.021431] atabus0 at ahcisata0 channel 0
[ 1.021431] atabus1 at ahcisata0 channel 1
[ 1.021431] atabus2 at ahcisata0 channel 2
[ 1.021431] atabus3 at ahcisata0 channel 3
[ 1.021431] atabus4 at ahcisata0 channel 4
[ 1.021431] atabus5 at ahcisata0 channel 5
[ 1.021431] isa0 at ichlpcib0
[ 1.021431] com1 at isa0 port 0x2f8-0x2ff irq 3: ns16550a, 16-byte FIFO
[ 1.021431] acpicpu0 at cpu0: ACPI CPU
[ 1.021431] acpicpu0: C1: FFH, lat  1 us, pow  1000 mW
[ 1.021431] acpicpu0: C2: FFH, lat  96 us, pow  350 mW
[ 1.021431] coretemp0 at cpu0: thermal sensor, 1 C resolution, Tjmax=100
[ 1.021431] acpicpu1 at cpu1: ACPI CPU
[ 1.021431] coretemp1 at cpu1: thermal sensor, 1 C resolution, Tjmax=100
[ 1.021431] acpicpu2 at cpu2: ACPI CPU
[ 1.021431] coretemp2 at cpu2: thermal sensor, 1 C resolution, Tjmax=100
[ 1.021431] acpicpu3 at cpu3: ACPI CPU
[ 1.021431] coretemp3 at cpu3: thermal sensor, 1 C resolution, Tjmax=100
[ 1.021431] timecounter: Timecounter "clockinterrupt" frequency 100 Hz quality 0
[ 1.021431] timecounter: Timecounter "TSC" frequency 3092842000 Hz quality 3000
[ 1.907097] uhub0 at usb0: NetBSD (0x0000) xHCI root hub (0x0000), class 9/0, rev 3.00/1.00, addr 0
[ 1.907097] uhub0: 2 ports with 2 removable, self powered
[ 1.907097] uhub1 at usb1: NetBSD (0x0000) xHCI root hub (0x0000), class 9/0, rev 2.00/1.00, addr 0
[ 1.907097] uhub1: 10 ports with 10 removable, self powered
[ 1.907097] IPsec: Initialized Security Association Processing.
[ 1.923540] uhub2 at usb2: NetBSD (0x0000) EHCI root hub (0x0000), class 9/0, rev 2.00/1.00, addr 1
[ 1.923540] uhub2: 2 ports with 2 removable, self powered
[ 1.923540] uhub3 at usb3: NetBSD (0x0000) UHCI root hub (0x0000), class 9/0, rev 1.00/1.00, addr 1
[ 1.923540] uhub3: 2 ports with 2 removable, self powered
[ 1.923540] uhub4 at usb4: NetBSD (0x0000) EHCI root hub (0x0000), class 9/0, rev 2.00/1.00, addr 1
[ 1.923540] uhub4: 2 ports with 2 removable, self powered
[ 2.003540] ahcisata0 port 0: device present, speed: 6.0Gb/s
[ 2.003540] ahcisata0 port 4: device present, speed: 1.5Gb/s
[ 2.383539] uhub5 at uhub1 port 3: vendor 0424 (0x0424) product 2660 (0x2660), class 9/0, rev 2.00/8.01, addr 1
[ 2.383539] uhub5: single transaction translator
[ 2.383539] uhub5: 2 ports with 1 removable, self powered
[ 2.993539] uhub6 at uhub4 port 1: vendor 8087 (0x8087) product 8000 (0x8000), class 9/0, rev 2.00/0.04, addr 2
[ 2.993539] uhub6: single transaction translator
[ 2.993539] uhub7 at uhub2 port 1: vendor 8087 (0x8087) product 8008 (0x8008), class 9/0, rev 2.00/0.04, addr 2
[ 2.993539] uhub7: single transaction translator
[ 2.993539] uhub6: 6 ports with 6 removable, self powered
[ 2.993539] uhub7: 4 ports with 4 removable, self powered
[ 3.563538] umass0 at uhub0 port 2 configuration 1 interface 0
[ 3.563538] umass0: USB (0x0781) SanDisk 3.2Gen1 (0x5567), rev 3.20/1.00, addr 2
[ 3.563538] umass0: using SCSI over Bulk-Only
[ 3.563538] scsibus0 at umass0: 2 targets, 1 lun per target
[ 3.573537] sd0 at scsibus0 target 0 lun 0: <USB, SanDisk 3.2Gen1, 1.00> disk removable
[ 3.573537] sd0: 29358 MB, 59648 cyl, 16 head, 63 sec, 512 bytes/sect x 60125184 sectors
[ 3.583536] wd0 at atabus0 drive 0
[ 3.583536] wd0: <ST2000DM001-1CH164>
[ 3.583536] wd0: drive supports 16-sector PIO transfers, LBA48 addressing
[ 3.583536] wd0: 1863 GB, 3876021 cyl, 16 head, 63 sec, 512 bytes/sect x 3907029168 sectors (4096 bytes/physsect;
first aligned sector: 8)
[ 3.593538] wd0: drive supports PIO mode 4, DMA mode 2, Ultra-DMA mode 6 (Ultra/133), WRITE DMA FUA, NCQ (32 tags)
[ 3.593538] wd0(ahcisata0:0:0): using PIO mode 4, DMA mode 2, Ultra-DMA mode 6 (Ultra/133) (using DMA), NCQ (31 ta
gs)
[ 3.593538] atapibus0 at atabus4: 1 targets
[ 3.603537] cd0 at atapibus0 drive 0: <hp      DVD-RAM GHA3N, KD5DAF43954, WH01> cdrom removable
[ 3.613539] cd0: drive supports PIO mode 4, DMA mode 2, Ultra-DMA mode 5 (Ultra/100)
[ 3.613539] cd0(ahcisata0:4:0): using PIO mode 4, DMA mode 2, Ultra-DMA mode 5 (Ultra/100) (using DMA)
[ 3.633538] uhidev0 at uhub1 port 5 configuration 1 interface 0
[ 3.633538] uhidev0: SEM (0x1a2c) USB Keyboard (0x2124), rev 1.10/1.10, addr 3, iclass 3/1
[ 3.643536] ukbd0 at uhidev0
[ 3.643536] wskbd1 at ukbd0 mux 1
[ 3.643536] wskbd1: connecting to wsdisplay0
[ 3.643536] uhidev1 at uhub1 port 5 configuration 1 interface 1
[ 3.643536] uhidev1: SEM (0x1a2c) USB Keyboard (0x2124), rev 1.10/1.10, addr 3, iclass 3/0
[ 3.643536] uhidev1: 2 report ids
[ 3.643536] uhid0 at uhidev1 reportid 1: input=2, output=0, feature=0
[ 3.643536] uhid1 at uhidev1 reportid 2: input=1, output=0, feature=0
[ 4.123538] uhidev2 at uhub1 port 6 configuration 1 interface 0
[ 4.123538] uhidev2: vendor 275d (0x275d) USB OPTICAL MOUSE (0x0ba6), rev 1.10/1.00, addr 4, iclass 3/1
[ 4.123538] ums0 at uhidev2: 3 buttons and Z dir
[ 4.123538] wsmouse1 at ums0 mux 0
[ 4.603537] uaudio0 at uhub1 port 9 configuration 1 interface 0
[ 4.603537] uaudio0: C-Media INC. (0x0d8c) USB Audio (0x0001), rev 1.10/0.10, addr 5
[ 4.603537] uaudio0: audio rev 1.00
[ 4.603537] audio0 at uaudio0: playback
[ 4.603537] audio0: slinear_le:16 2ch 48000Hz, blk 11520 bytes (60ms) for playback
[ 4.603537] spkr1 at audio0: PC Speaker (synthesized)
[ 4.603537] wsbell at spkr1 not configured
[11.453530] ipmi0: version 32.0 interface KCS iobase 0xca2/0x2 spacing 1
[11.453530] ipmi0: ID 19.2 IPMI 2.0 Available
[11.453530] ipmi0: Additional Chassis FRU SEL SDR Sensor
[11.453530] ipmi0: Manufacturer 0000b Product 200b
[11.453530] ipmi0: Firmware 1.32
[11.453530] swwdog0: software watchdog initialized
[11.493529] WARNING: 1 error while detecting hardware; check system log.
[11.493529] boot device: sd0
[11.493529] root on sd0a dumps on sd0b
[11.503529] root file system type: ffs
[11.503529] kern.module.path=/stand/amd64/10.0/modules
[11.503529] WARNING: NVRAM century is 33 but RTC year is 2024
[24.873516] wsdisplay0: screen 1 added (80x25, vt100 emulation)
[24.873516] wsdisplay0: screen 2 added (80x25, vt100 emulation)
[24.873516] wsdisplay0: screen 3 added (80x25, vt100 emulation)
[24.883516] wsdisplay0: screen 4 added (80x25, vt100 emulation


February 18, 2024

Unix Stack Exchange NetBSD: how to mount a disk image?

I have create a disk image on netbsd

newfs -F -s 10G 1.img

How to mount it?

I have tried "nodev" but give error and try to mount /mnt/p2

mount -v -o nodev /home/user/1.img /mnt/p2
DragonFly BSD Digest Lazy Reading for 2024/02/18

Mini-theme: collections of media.

Your unrelated music link of the week: Omni: Souvenir.


February 14, 2024

Unix Stack Exchange Is possible to find a single file of NOT installed package on Netbsd?

Simple question:

On Fedora, i want to search mplayer..

dnf provides *bin/mplayer

on Debian

apt -y install apt-file
apt-file update
apt-file search mplayer|grep bin

on Freebsd

pkg install -y pkg-provides
pkg provides -u 
pkg provides *bin/mplayer$

Anything similar on netbsd? Actually seems no similar tool exist.


February 12, 2024

Unix Stack Exchange Netbsd, what is dk?

Simple question, today making iostat on netbsd machine I see..

    iostat 2 3
          tty              ld0               ld1               dk0               dk1               dk2               dk3               dk4               cd0             CPU
     tin  tout  KB/t  t/s  MB/s   KB/t  t/s  MB/s   KB/t  t/s  MB/s   KB/t  t/s  MB/s   KB/t  t/s  MB/s   KB/t  t/s  MB/s   KB/t  t/s  MB/s   KB/t  t/s  MB/s  us ni sy in id

---explanation---

ld0 is the first virtio hd
ld1 is the second virtio hd
cd0 is the first SATA cdrom

what is dk1-4?


February 11, 2024

DragonFly BSD Digest Lazy Reading for 2024/02/11

No theme this week.