NetBSD Planet


March 02, 2024

Pullup pkgsrc [pullup-pkgsrc #6839] [[email protected]: CVS commit: pkgsrc/editors/nano]

March 01, 2024

Pullup 8 [pullup-8 #1944] netinet6: Avoid NPD on certain inet6 addr configs (PR 53922)
Pullup 9 [pullup-9 #1812] netinet6: Avoid NPD on certain inet6 addr configs (PR 53922)
Pullup 10 [pullup-10 #619] netinet6: Avoid NPD on certain inet6 addr configs (PR 53922)
Pullup 10 [pullup-10 #618] netinet: Attribute arp debug message (PR 57959).
Pullup 8 [pullup-8 #1943] getconf(1): Accept with or without leading _ (PR 57875).
Pullup 9 [pullup-9 #1811] getconf(1): Accept with or without leading _ (PR 57875).
Pullup 10 [pullup-10 #617] getconf(1): Accept with or without leading _ (PR 57875).
Pullup 8 [pullup-8 #1942] [PATCH] urtwn(4): Avoid deadlock on command ring overflow (PR 57965).
Pullup 9 [pullup-9 #1810] [PATCH] urtwn(4): Avoid deadlock on command ring overflow (PR 57965).
Pullup 10 [pullup-10 #616] urtwn(4): Avoid deadlock on command ring overflow (PR 57965).
Pullup 9 [pullup-9 #1809] [PATCH] netinet6: Deliver timestamps also to raw sockets (PR 57955).
Pullup 10 [pullup-10 #615] netinet6: Deliver timestamps also to raw sockets (PR 57955).
Pullup pkgsrc [pullup-pkgsrc #6838] security/libfido2: Fix NetBSD support (PR 57919)
Pullup 8 [pullup-8 #1941] getnameinfo(3): Document NI_NUMERICSCOPE (PR 57832).
Pullup 9 [pullup-9 #1808] getnameinfo(3): Document NI_NUMERICSCOPE (PR 57832).
Pullup 8 [pullup-8 #1940] usbdi(9): Avoid locking against self when racing to enter ddb (PR 57783)

February 29, 2024

UnitedBSD Netbsd 10 RC5 release version problem

Hi

For testing I have a netbsd 10RC4 vm which I upgraded to RC5.

I did the sysupgrade with the url for RC5 and everything went well.

When I do uname -a as well as cat /etc/release. Everything shows RC5, its nice.

But the version about dmesg is

# dmesg | head
[     1.000000] Copyright (c) 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003,
[     1.000000]     2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013,
[     1.000000]     2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021, 2022, 2023,
[     1.000000]     2024
[     1.000000]     The NetBSD Foundation, Inc.  All rights reserved.
[     1.000000] Copyright (c) 1982, 1986, 1989, 1991, 1993
[     1.000000]     The Regents of the University of California.  All rights reserved.

[     1.000000] NetBSD 10.0_RC4 (GENERIC) #0: Tue Feb  6 12:38:53 UTC 2024
[     1.000000] 	[email protected]:/usr/src/sys/arch/amd64/compile/GENERIC

I read a very similar discussion here about the same subject, however the outcome of the discussions did not seem to fit my case.

Do you know why ?

Pullup pkgsrc [pullup-pkgsrc #6837] 2 forwarded messages...

February 28, 2024

NetBSD Blog NetBSD 10.0 RC5 available!

The NetBSD project is pleased to announce the fifth (and probably last) release candidate of the upcoming 10.0 release, please help testing!
See the release announcement for details.

The netbsd-10 release branch is more than a year old now, so it is high time the 10.0 release makes it to the front stage. This matches the long time it took for the development branch to get ready for branching, a lot of development went into this new release.

This also caused the release announcement to be one of the longest we ever did.

Since RC1 there have been numerous changes, including major updates to external software included in the release: Postfix, OpenSSH, and the firmware used for Raspberry PI devices. Various issues with RC1 have been fixed, including installer (sysinst) crashes. Lots of architecture specific fixes happend, e.g. various toolchain changes for VAX (so it is now finaly self-hosting again), and kernel changes for macppc, netwinder, and alpha.

For RC3 only few (relatively) minor changes were made, including https certificate verification in libfetch (which is used by pkg_ad(1)), and also improvements to the EFI bootloader to better deal with booting from CD (or in virtual machines ISO images), plus lots of various bug fixes.

RC4 became necessary as a few very important DRM/KMS issues especially for Intel GPUs have been resolved. And as an (unexpected) bonus support for the Nintendo Wii has been added to the evbppc port.

RC5 has a few important security related updates of third party components (named, nsd, unbound, wpa_supplicant).

Especially on amd64 machines please notes that we got a new DRM/KMS subsystem version, and this may lead to fallout on some hardware. Unfortunately not all known bugs from the release engineering pre-release task list could be fixed in time for this release - we will continue to improve the current state and hope to have more of them solved for the next (10.1) release.

If you want to test 10.0 RC5 please check the installation notes for your architecture and download the preferred install image from the CDN or if you are using an ARM based device from the netbsd-10 builds from the bootable ARM images page.

If you have any issues with installation or run into issues with the system during use, please contact us on one of the mailing lists or file a problem report.


February 27, 2024

UnitedBSD Prosody XMPP server is now available for SmartOS/OmniOS/OpenIndiana/Tribblix

What a good news !

Prosody is basic but really easy to configure and set up.
For me, it's the simplest of all, its configuration takes only 2 minutes.

If someone manages to get ejabberd and jabberd working on pkgsrc, I'm interested!
I've spent a lot of time on both, but I've never managed to get them working
It seems to me that the packages are broken.
Prosody is working.

Just for the try :
We will set up a test XMPP server on OmniOS with 2 users (user1 and user2), the ability to create groups for users, and the ability for both users to exchange files.
For testing purposes, we will generate a self-signed SSL certificate (but it's easy to specify a real certificate and domain).
The server has the IP address 192.168.95.31 for our test.

Let's get started!

1) Installing the pkgsrc repository
(switch to root)
The commands block below is a summary of the guide available here :
[https://pkgsrc.joyent.com/install-on-illumos/]
Copy/paste the following commands block into a shell:

cd /tmp && BOOTSTRAP_TAR="bootstrap-trunk-x86_64-20240116.tar.gz" && BOOTSTRAP_SHA="4d92a333587d9dcc669ff64264451ca65da701b7" && curl -O https://pkgsrc.smartos.org/packages/SmartOS/bootstrap/${BOOTSTRAP_TAR} && tar -zxpf ${BOOTSTRAP_TAR} -C / && sed -i 's/PATH=\(.*\)/PATH=\1:\/opt\/local\/sbin:\/opt\/local\/bin/' /etc/default/login && cd /tmp && UPGRADE_TAR="bootstrap-trunk-x86_64-20240116-upgrade.tar.gz" && UPGRADE_SHA="3099211460e84c34b9f558c8f7354a871187be41" && curl -O https://pkgsrc.smartos.org/packages/SmartOS/bootstrap-upgrade/${UPGRADE_TAR} && tar -zxpf ${UPGRADE_TAR} -C / && echo 'PATH=/opt/local/sbin:/opt/local/bin:$PATH' >> /etc/profile && echo 'MANPATH=/opt/local/man:$MANPATH' >> /etc/profile 
alias pkg_add=/opt/local/sbin/pkg_add ; alias pkgin=/opt/local/bin/pkgin
pkg_add -U pkg_install pkgin libarchive && pkgin clean && pkgin -y upgrade

Close your root session and reconnect as root to reload the PATH

2) Installing Prosody

pkgin -y in prosody
pkg install nano

3) Configuring Prosody

cp /opt/local/etc/prosody/prosody.cfg.lua /opt/local/etc/prosody/prosody.cfg.lua.BAK
nano /opt/local/etc/prosody/prosody.cfg.lua
-- CONFIGURATION:
VirtualHost "192.168.95.31"
    enabled = true
    ssl = {
        key = "/opt/local/etc/prosody/certs/192.168.95.31.key";
        certificate = "/opt/local/etc/prosody/certs/192.168.95.31.crt";
    }

Component "conference.192.168.95.31" "muc"
Component "share.192.168.95.31" "http_file_share"
prosodyctl cert generate 192.168.95.31

By default, the created certificates will be placed in /var/db/prosody/certs.
We need to move them:

mv /var/db/prosody/* /opt/local/etc/prosody/certs/

4) Create users

prosodyctl register "user1" "192.168.95.31" "password-user1"
prosodyctl register "user2" "192.168.95.31" "password-user2"

5) Start Prosody

svcadm enable svc:/pkgsrc/prosody:default
svcs prosody

For the XMPP client software Spark, modifications are needed to connect when using a self-signed certificate on the server (as in this tutorial). (But you can use Conversations (android), Psi, Psi+ (windows), Pidgin etc..)
Launch the software. An authentication prompt appears.

Click Connect and accept everything.
(off course, it's just for testing purposes)

/r/NetBSD Welcome to NetBSD 10.0_RC5!
submitted by /u/ptkrisada
[link] [comments]
UnitedBSD Uber n00b seeks advice on Intel HD 4600

Hi Teams

First install of NetBSD on i5 4570T / Intel D 4600 which went fine until I tried to startx - which resulted in a bit of a trippy experience - like fractals 🙂

Seen some posts about Intel gfx but these are from 21 / 22

Any tips on the above to get xorg working right with this chipset?

The NetBSD Foundation NetBSD 10.0 RC5 is available!

February 26, 2024

UnitedBSD Xen on NetBSD

Hello everyone,

After QEMU and NVMM, I'm now looking into Xen on NetBSD. I managed to install Xen and boot into it. I want to create my first VM, but unfortunately, I can't find the right settings in the .cfg file; the VM starts but then hangs. Because of OVMF ??

Here's the complete procedure I followed:
1) Install NetBSD 10 complete version (including X).
2) Install Xen Kernel:

   pkgin -y in xenkernel418
   cp -p /usr/pkg/xen418-kernel/xen.gz /

3) Install Xen tools:

   pkgin -y in xentools418
   cd /dev && sh MAKEDEV xen
   cp /usr/pkg/share/examples/rc.d/xencommons /etc/rc.d/
   echo xencommons=YES >> /etc/rc.conf

4) Install the provided dom0:

   cd / && ftp http://ftp.netbsd.org/pub/NetBSD/NetBSD-10.0_RC4/amd64/binary/kernel/netbsd-XEN3_DOM0.gz

5) Modify the /boot.cfg file:

6) Install OVMF:

   pkgin -y in OVMF

7) Restart into Xen (choose 4 during boot).

8) Install TigerVNC (either on the host or on a client on the same network):

   pkgin -y in tigervnc

9) Create the first VM:

I tried with bios, bios_path_override, firmware, firmware_override. Nothing is working.
Any idea ?


February 25, 2024

/r/NetBSD 9.3 and 10.4RC4 have problems with SD card on macppc

I'm not sure how to submit a bug report for this as I don't have a functioning NetBSD system.

The macppc port ran great on my ibook g4 12" with the original platter drive. I replaced that with a SD card adapter and tried to do a fresh install but during the boot process the kernel does not like the adapter. If gives an error about reading fsbn0 and continually times out. I can get to the shell but any drive access results in the long timeout errors.

Now for reference I just installed OpenBSD 7.4 on this same hardware and it runs great, zero issues or complaints with the adapter.

submitted by /u/sopabe6197
[link] [comments]
NetBSD Installation and Upgrading on DaemonForums NetBSD 10 RC_10 experiences
A few days ago I installed the 4th release candidate of NetBSD on a 32 GB USB 3.0 memory stick.

Install went well and fast. After booting up I installed the Firefox compiled package with pkgin This also went smooth.

I did not have to do anything for the X configuration. But when I started firefox the system became unresponsive (crashed) and seemed to be busy writing a dump file.
Sometimes OpenBSD also shows the same behaviour on this system. Powering off is the only way to regain control.

The system I used is my grumpy HP Proliant server. Linux, FreeBSD and DragonFlyBSD complain that about mixed 32bit and 64bit ACPI data.
The cheap 64bit Xeon CPU has a built-in Matrox VGA processor (mga driver in X Window) and probably uses part of the normal ECC RAM.

NetBSD also mentions problems with the ACPI stuff. It seems to truncate some entries:
The dmesg:
Code:

$ sed -e "s/^\[    /[/" U/dmesg_netbsd10_rc4.txt

[ 1.000000] Copyright (c) 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003,
[ 1.000000]    2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013,
[ 1.000000]    2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021, 2022, 2023,
[ 1.000000]    2024
[ 1.000000]    The NetBSD Foundation, Inc.  All rights reserved.
[ 1.000000] Copyright (c) 1982, 1986, 1989, 1991, 1993
[ 1.000000]    The Regents of the University of California.  All rights reserved.

[ 1.000000] NetBSD 10.0_RC4 (GENERIC) #0: Tue Feb  6 12:38:53 UTC 2024
[ 1.000000]    [email protected]:/usr/src/sys/arch/amd64/compile/GENERIC
[ 1.000000] total memory = 4061 MB
[ 1.000000] avail memory = 3902 MB
[ 1.000000] timecounter: Timecounters tick every 10.000 msec
[ 1.000000] Kernelized RAIDframe activated
[ 1.000000] timecounter: Timecounter "i8254" frequency 1193182 Hz quality 100
[ 1.000004] mainbus0 (root)
[ 1.000004] ACPI: RSDP 0x00000000000F4F00 000024 (v02 HP    )
[ 1.000004] ACPI: XSDT 0x00000000F1DE6400 0000B4 (v01 HP    ProLiant 00000002 ??  0000162E)
[ 1.000004] ACPI: FACP 0x00000000F1DE6540 0000F4 (v03 HP    ProLiant 00000002 ??  0000162E)
[ 1.000004] Firmware Warning (ACPI): 32/64X length mismatch in FADT/Pm1aControlBlock: 16/32 (20221020/tbfadt-640)
[ 1.000004] Firmware Warning (ACPI): 32/64X length mismatch in FADT/Pm2ControlBlock: 8/32 (20221020/tbfadt-640)
[ 1.000004] Firmware Warning (ACPI): Invalid length for FADT/Pm1aControlBlock: 32, using default 16 (20221020/tbfa
dt-742)
[ 1.000004] Firmware Warning (ACPI): Invalid length for FADT/Pm2ControlBlock: 32, using default 8 (20221020/tbfadt
-742)

[ 1.000004] ACPI: DSDT 0x00000000F1DE6640 002A13 (v01 HP    DSDT    00000001 INTL 20030228)
[ 1.000004] ACPI: FACS 0x00000000F1DE4140 000040
[ 1.000004] ACPI: SPCR 0x00000000F1DE4180 000050 (v01 HP    SPCRRBSU 00000001 ??  0000162E)
[ 1.000004] ACPI: MCFG 0x00000000F1DE4200 00003C (v01 HP    ProLiant 00000001      00000000)
[ 1.000004] ACPI: HPET 0x00000000F1DE4240 000038 (v01 HP    ProLiant 00000002 ??  0000162E)
[ 1.000004] ACPI: FFFF 0x00000000F1DE4280 000064 (v02 HP    ProLiant 00000002 ??  0000162E)
[ 1.000004] ACPI: SPMI 0x00000000F1DE4300 000040 (v05 HP    ProLiant 00000001 ??  0000162E)
[ 1.000004] ACPI: ERST 0x00000000F1DE4340 000230 (v01 HP    ProLiant 00000001 ??  0000162E)
[ 1.000004] ACPI: APIC 0x00000000F1DE4580 000252 (v01 HP    ProLiant 00000002      00000000)
[ 1.000004] ACPI: FFFF 0x00000000F1DE4800 000176 (v01 HP    ProLiant 00000001 ??  0000162E)
[ 1.000004] ACPI: BERT 0x00000000F1DE4980 000030 (v01 HP    ProLiant 00000001 ??  0000162E)
[ 1.000004] ACPI: HEST 0x00000000F1DE49C0 0000BC (v01 HP    ProLiant 00000001 ??  0000162E)
[ 1.000004] ACPI: DMAR 0x00000000F1DE4A80 00030E (v01 HP    ProLiant 00000001 ??  0000162E)
[ 1.000004] ACPI: FFFF 0x00000000F1DE63C0 00002D (v01 HP    ProLiant 00000001      00000000)
[ 1.000004] ACPI: SSDT 0x00000000F1DE9080 000137 (v03 HP    CRSPCI0  00000002 HP  00000001)
[ 1.000004] ACPI: SSDT 0x00000000F1DE91C0 000573 (v03 HP    riser0  00000002 INTL 20030228)
[ 1.000004] ACPI: SSDT 0x00000000F1DE9740 0001E1 (v01 HP    pcc      00000001 INTL 20090625)
[ 1.000004] ACPI: SSDT 0x00000000F1DE9940 000377 (v01 HP    pmab    00000001 INTL 20090625)
[ 1.000004] ACPI: SSDT 0x00000000F1DE9CC0 0009E4 (v01 INTEL  PPM RCM  80000001 INTL 20061109)
[ 1.000004] ACPI: 6 ACPI AML tables successfully acquired and loaded
[ 1.000004] ioapic0 at mainbus0 apid 8: pa 0xfec00000, version 0x20, 24 pins
[ 1.000004] x2APIC available but disabled by DMAR table
[ 1.000004] cpu0 at mainbus0 apid 0
[ 1.000004] cpu0: Use lfence to serialize rdtsc
[ 1.000004] cpu0: Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E3-1220 v3 @ 3.10GHz, id 0x306c3
[ 1.000004] cpu0: node 0, package 0, core 0, smt 0
[ 1.000004] cpu1 at mainbus0 apid 2
[ 1.000004] cpu1: Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E3-1220 v3 @ 3.10GHz, id 0x306c3
[ 1.000004] cpu1: node 0, package 0, core 1, smt 0
[ 1.000004] cpu2 at mainbus0 apid 4
[ 1.000004] cpu2: Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E3-1220 v3 @ 3.10GHz, id 0x306c3
[ 1.000004] cpu2: node 0, package 0, core 2, smt 0
[ 1.000004] cpu3 at mainbus0 apid 6
[ 1.000004] cpu3: Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E3-1220 v3 @ 3.10GHz, id 0x306c3
[ 1.000004] cpu3: node 0, package 0, core 3, smt 0
[ 1.000004] acpi0 at mainbus0: Intel ACPICA 20221020
[ 1.000004] acpi0: X/RSDT: OemId <HP    ,ProLiant,00000002>, AslId <  <2147483602>^D,0000162e>
[ 1.000004] acpi0: MCFG: segment 0, bus 0-63, address 0x00000000f4000000
[ 1.000004] acpi0: SCI interrupting at int 9
[ 1.000004] acpi0: fixed power button present
[ 1.000004] timecounter: Timecounter "ACPI-Fast" frequency 3579545 Hz quality 1000
[ 1.021219] hpet0 at acpi0: high precision event timer (mem 0xfed00000-0xfed00400)
[ 1.021219] timecounter: Timecounter "hpet0" frequency 14318180 Hz quality 2000
[ 1.021431] ipmi_acpi0 at acpi0 (MI0, IPI0001-0): io 0xca2-0xca3
[ 1.021431] ipmi0 at ipmi_acpi0
[ 1.021431] attimer1 at acpi0 (TIME, PNP0100): io 0x40-0x43 irq 0
[ 1.021431] pcppi1 at acpi0 (BEEP, PNP0800): io 0x61
[ 1.021431] spkr0 at pcppi1: PC Speaker
[ 1.021431] wsbell at spkr0 not configured
[ 1.021431] midi0 at pcppi1: PC speaker
[ 1.021431] sysbeep0 at pcppi1
[ 1.021431] com0 at acpi0 (COMA, PNP0501-0): io 0x3f8-0x3ff irq 4
[ 1.021431] com0: ns16550a, 16-byte FIFO
[ 1.021431] pckbc1 at acpi0 (KBD, PNP0303) (kbd port): io 0x60,0x64 irq 1
[ 1.021431] pckbc2 at acpi0 (PS2M, PNP0F13) (aux port): irq 12
[ 1.021431] PMI0 (ACPI000D) at acpi0 not configured
[ 1.021431] acpitz0 at acpi0 (THM0): cpu0
[ 1.021431] acpitz0: levels: critical 31.3 C, passive 9.8 C, passive cooling
[ 1.021431] attimer1: attached to pcppi1
[ 1.021431] pckbd0 at pckbc1 (kbd slot)
[ 1.021431] pckbc1: using irq 1 for kbd slot
[ 1.021431] wskbd0 at pckbd0: console keyboard
[ 1.021431] pms0 at pckbc1 (aux slot)
[ 1.021431] pckbc1: using irq 12 for aux slot
[ 1.021431] wsmouse0 at pms0 mux 0
[ 1.021431] pci0 at mainbus0 bus 0: configuration mode 1
[ 1.021431] pci0: i/o space, memory space enabled, rd/line, rd/mult, wr/inv ok
[ 1.021431] pchb0 at pci0 dev 0 function 0: Intel Xeon E3-1200 v3 Host Bridge, DRAM (rev. 0x06)
[ 1.021431] ppb0 at pci0 dev 1 function 0: Intel Haswell PCI-E x16 Controller (rev. 0x06)
[ 1.021431] ppb0: PCI Express capability version 2 <Root Port of PCI-E Root Complex> x8 @ 8.0GT/s
[ 1.021431] pci1 at ppb0 bus 4
[ 1.021431] pci1: i/o space, memory space enabled, rd/line, wr/inv ok
[ 1.021431] ppb1 at pci0 dev 1 function 1: Intel Haswell PCI-E x8 Controller (rev. 0x06)
[ 1.021431] ppb1: PCI Express capability version 2 <Root Port of PCI-E Root Complex> x8 @ 8.0GT/s
[ 1.021431] pci2 at ppb1 bus 7
[ 1.021431] pci2: i/o space, memory space enabled, rd/line, wr/inv ok
[ 1.021431] xhci0 at pci0 dev 20 function 0: Intel 8 Series USB xHCI (rev. 0x04)
[ 1.021431] xhci0: 64-bit DMA
[ 1.021431] xhci0: interrupting at msi0 vec 0
[ 1.021431] xhci0: xHCI version 1.0
[ 1.021431] usb0 at xhci0: USB revision 3.0
[ 1.021431] usb1 at xhci0: USB revision 2.0
[ 1.021431] ehci0 at pci0 dev 26 function 0: Intel 8 Series USB EHCI (rev. 0x04)
[ 1.021431] ehci0: 64-bit DMA
[ 1.021431] ehci0: interrupting at ioapic0 pin 21
[ 1.021431] ehci0: BIOS has given up ownership
[ 1.021431] ehci0: EHCI version 1.0
[ 1.021431] ehci0: Using DMA subregion for control data structures
[ 1.021431] usb2 at ehci0: USB revision 2.0
[ 1.021431] ppb2 at pci0 dev 28 function 0: Intel 8 Series PCIe (rev. 0xd4)
[ 1.021431] ppb2: PCI Express capability version 2 <Root Port of PCI-E Root Complex> x1 @ 5.0GT/s
[ 1.021431] pci3 at ppb2 bus 10
[ 1.021431] pci3: i/o space, memory space enabled, rd/line, wr/inv ok
[ 1.021431] ppb3 at pci0 dev 28 function 4: Intel 8 Series PCIe (rev. 0xd4)
[ 1.021431] ppb3: PCI Express capability version 2 <Root Port of PCI-E Root Complex> x1 @ 5.0GT/s
[ 1.021431] pci4 at ppb3 bus 2
[ 1.021431] pci4: i/o space, memory space enabled, rd/line, wr/inv ok
[ 1.021431] ppb4 at pci0 dev 28 function 5: Intel 8 Series PCIe (rev. 0xd4)
[ 1.021431] ppb4: PCI Express capability version 2 <Root Port of PCI-E Root Complex> x1 @ 5.0GT/s
[ 1.021431] pci5 at ppb4 bus 3
[ 1.021431] pci5: i/o space, memory space enabled, rd/line, wr/inv ok
[ 1.021431] bge0 at pci5 dev 0 function 0: Broadcom BCM5720 Gigabit Ethernet
[ 1.021431] bge0: APE firmware NCSI 1.1.15.0
[ 1.021431] bge0: interrupting at msix1 vec 0
[ 1.021431] bge0: HW config 002b10d4, 00006014, 0000aa38, 00000000 00000000
[ 1.021431] bge0: ASIC BCM5720 A0 (0x5720000), Ethernet address a0:1d:48:97:5b:74
[ 1.021431] bge0: setting short Tx thresholds
[ 1.021431] brgphy0 at bge0 phy 1: BCM5720C 1000BASE-T media interface, rev. 0
[ 1.021431] brgphy0: 10baseT, 10baseT-FDX, 100baseTX, 100baseTX-FDX, 1000baseT, 1000baseT-FDX, auto
[ 1.021431] bge1 at pci5 dev 0 function 1: Broadcom BCM5720 Gigabit Ethernet
[ 1.021431] bge1: APE firmware NCSI 1.1.15.0
[ 1.021431] bge1: interrupting at msix2 vec 0
[ 1.021431] bge1: HW config 002b10d4, 00006014, 0000aa38, 00000000 00000000
[ 1.021431] bge1: ASIC BCM5720 A0 (0x5720000), Ethernet address a0:1d:48:97:5b:75
[ 1.021431] bge1: setting short Tx thresholds
[ 1.021431] brgphy1 at bge1 phy 2: BCM5720C 1000BASE-T media interface, rev. 0
[ 1.021431] brgphy1: 10baseT, 10baseT-FDX, 100baseTX, 100baseTX-FDX, 1000baseT, 1000baseT-FDX, auto
[ 1.021431] ppb5 at pci0 dev 28 function 6: Intel 8 Series PCIe (rev. 0xd4)
[ 1.021431] ppb5: PCI Express capability version 2 <Root Port of PCI-E Root Complex> x1 @ 5.0GT/s
[ 1.021431] pci6 at ppb5 bus 13
[ 1.021431] pci6: i/o space, memory space enabled, rd/line, wr/inv ok
[ 1.021431] ppb6 at pci0 dev 28 function 7: Intel 8 Series PCIe (rev. 0xd4)
[ 1.021431] ppb6: PCI Express capability version 2 <Root Port of PCI-E Root Complex> x1 @ 5.0GT/s
[ 1.021431] ppb6: link is x1 @ 2.5GT/s
[ 1.021431] pci7 at ppb6 bus 1
[ 1.021431] pci7: i/o space, memory space enabled, rd/line, wr/inv ok
[ 1.021431] Hewlett-Packard iLO3 Slave (miscellaneous system, revision 0x05) at pci7 dev 0 function 0 not configured
[ 1.021431] vga0 at pci7 dev 0 function 1: Matrox MGA G200eH (rev. 0x00)
[ 1.021431] wsdisplay0 at vga0 kbdmux 1: console (80x25, vt100 emulation), using wskbd0
[ 1.021431] wsmux1: connecting to wsdisplay0
[ 1.021431] drm at vga0 not configured
[ 1.021431] Hewlett-Packard iLO3 Management (miscellaneous system, revision 0x05) at pci7 dev 0 function 2 not configured
[ 1.021431] uhci0 at pci7 dev 0 function 4: Hewlett-Packard iLO3 Virtual USB (rev. 0x02)
[ 1.021431] uhci0: interrupting at msi3 vec 0
[ 1.021431] usb3 at uhci0: USB revision 1.0
[ 1.021431] ehci1 at pci0 dev 29 function 0: Intel 8 Series USB EHCI (rev. 0x04)
[ 1.021431] ehci1: 64-bit DMA
[ 1.021431] ehci1: interrupting at ioapic0 pin 20
[ 1.021431] ehci1: BIOS has given up ownership
[ 1.021431] ehci1: EHCI version 1.0
[ 1.021431] ehci1: Using DMA subregion for control data structures
[ 1.021431] usb4 at ehci1: USB revision 2.0
[ 1.021431] ichlpcib0 at pci0 dev 31 function 0: Intel C222 LPC (rev. 0x04)
[ 1.021431] timecounter: Timecounter "ichlpcib0" frequency 3579545 Hz quality 1000
[ 1.021431] ichlpcib0: 24-bit timer
[ 1.021431] tco0 at ichlpcib0: TCO (watchdog) timer configured.
[ 1.021431] tco0: autoconfiguration error: TCO timer reboot disabled by hardware; hope SMBIOS properly handles it.
[ 1.021431] tco0: Min/Max interval 1/367 seconds
[ 1.021431] ahcisata0 at pci0 dev 31 function 2: Intel 8 Series (desktop) SATA Controller (AHCI) (rev. 0x04)
[ 1.021431] ahcisata0: 64-bit DMA
[ 1.021431] ahcisata0: AHCI revision 1.30, 6 ports, 32 slots, CAP 0xdf30ff45<EMS,PSC,SSC,PMD,ISS=0x3=Gen3,SCLO,SAL,SALP,SSS,SMPS,SNCQ,S64A>
[ 1.021431] ahcisata0: interrupting at msi4 vec 0
[ 1.021431] atabus0 at ahcisata0 channel 0
[ 1.021431] atabus1 at ahcisata0 channel 1
[ 1.021431] atabus2 at ahcisata0 channel 2
[ 1.021431] atabus3 at ahcisata0 channel 3
[ 1.021431] atabus4 at ahcisata0 channel 4
[ 1.021431] atabus5 at ahcisata0 channel 5
[ 1.021431] isa0 at ichlpcib0
[ 1.021431] com1 at isa0 port 0x2f8-0x2ff irq 3: ns16550a, 16-byte FIFO
[ 1.021431] acpicpu0 at cpu0: ACPI CPU
[ 1.021431] acpicpu0: C1: FFH, lat  1 us, pow  1000 mW
[ 1.021431] acpicpu0: C2: FFH, lat  96 us, pow  350 mW
[ 1.021431] coretemp0 at cpu0: thermal sensor, 1 C resolution, Tjmax=100
[ 1.021431] acpicpu1 at cpu1: ACPI CPU
[ 1.021431] coretemp1 at cpu1: thermal sensor, 1 C resolution, Tjmax=100
[ 1.021431] acpicpu2 at cpu2: ACPI CPU
[ 1.021431] coretemp2 at cpu2: thermal sensor, 1 C resolution, Tjmax=100
[ 1.021431] acpicpu3 at cpu3: ACPI CPU
[ 1.021431] coretemp3 at cpu3: thermal sensor, 1 C resolution, Tjmax=100
[ 1.021431] timecounter: Timecounter "clockinterrupt" frequency 100 Hz quality 0
[ 1.021431] timecounter: Timecounter "TSC" frequency 3092842000 Hz quality 3000
[ 1.907097] uhub0 at usb0: NetBSD (0x0000) xHCI root hub (0x0000), class 9/0, rev 3.00/1.00, addr 0
[ 1.907097] uhub0: 2 ports with 2 removable, self powered
[ 1.907097] uhub1 at usb1: NetBSD (0x0000) xHCI root hub (0x0000), class 9/0, rev 2.00/1.00, addr 0
[ 1.907097] uhub1: 10 ports with 10 removable, self powered
[ 1.907097] IPsec: Initialized Security Association Processing.
[ 1.923540] uhub2 at usb2: NetBSD (0x0000) EHCI root hub (0x0000), class 9/0, rev 2.00/1.00, addr 1
[ 1.923540] uhub2: 2 ports with 2 removable, self powered
[ 1.923540] uhub3 at usb3: NetBSD (0x0000) UHCI root hub (0x0000), class 9/0, rev 1.00/1.00, addr 1
[ 1.923540] uhub3: 2 ports with 2 removable, self powered
[ 1.923540] uhub4 at usb4: NetBSD (0x0000) EHCI root hub (0x0000), class 9/0, rev 2.00/1.00, addr 1
[ 1.923540] uhub4: 2 ports with 2 removable, self powered
[ 2.003540] ahcisata0 port 0: device present, speed: 6.0Gb/s
[ 2.003540] ahcisata0 port 4: device present, speed: 1.5Gb/s
[ 2.383539] uhub5 at uhub1 port 3: vendor 0424 (0x0424) product 2660 (0x2660), class 9/0, rev 2.00/8.01, addr 1
[ 2.383539] uhub5: single transaction translator
[ 2.383539] uhub5: 2 ports with 1 removable, self powered
[ 2.993539] uhub6 at uhub4 port 1: vendor 8087 (0x8087) product 8000 (0x8000), class 9/0, rev 2.00/0.04, addr 2
[ 2.993539] uhub6: single transaction translator
[ 2.993539] uhub7 at uhub2 port 1: vendor 8087 (0x8087) product 8008 (0x8008), class 9/0, rev 2.00/0.04, addr 2
[ 2.993539] uhub7: single transaction translator
[ 2.993539] uhub6: 6 ports with 6 removable, self powered
[ 2.993539] uhub7: 4 ports with 4 removable, self powered
[ 3.563538] umass0 at uhub0 port 2 configuration 1 interface 0
[ 3.563538] umass0: USB (0x0781) SanDisk 3.2Gen1 (0x5567), rev 3.20/1.00, addr 2
[ 3.563538] umass0: using SCSI over Bulk-Only
[ 3.563538] scsibus0 at umass0: 2 targets, 1 lun per target
[ 3.573537] sd0 at scsibus0 target 0 lun 0: <USB, SanDisk 3.2Gen1, 1.00> disk removable
[ 3.573537] sd0: 29358 MB, 59648 cyl, 16 head, 63 sec, 512 bytes/sect x 60125184 sectors
[ 3.583536] wd0 at atabus0 drive 0
[ 3.583536] wd0: <ST2000DM001-1CH164>
[ 3.583536] wd0: drive supports 16-sector PIO transfers, LBA48 addressing
[ 3.583536] wd0: 1863 GB, 3876021 cyl, 16 head, 63 sec, 512 bytes/sect x 3907029168 sectors (4096 bytes/physsect;
first aligned sector: 8)
[ 3.593538] wd0: drive supports PIO mode 4, DMA mode 2, Ultra-DMA mode 6 (Ultra/133), WRITE DMA FUA, NCQ (32 tags)
[ 3.593538] wd0(ahcisata0:0:0): using PIO mode 4, DMA mode 2, Ultra-DMA mode 6 (Ultra/133) (using DMA), NCQ (31 ta
gs)
[ 3.593538] atapibus0 at atabus4: 1 targets
[ 3.603537] cd0 at atapibus0 drive 0: <hp      DVD-RAM GHA3N, KD5DAF43954, WH01> cdrom removable
[ 3.613539] cd0: drive supports PIO mode 4, DMA mode 2, Ultra-DMA mode 5 (Ultra/100)
[ 3.613539] cd0(ahcisata0:4:0): using PIO mode 4, DMA mode 2, Ultra-DMA mode 5 (Ultra/100) (using DMA)
[ 3.633538] uhidev0 at uhub1 port 5 configuration 1 interface 0
[ 3.633538] uhidev0: SEM (0x1a2c) USB Keyboard (0x2124), rev 1.10/1.10, addr 3, iclass 3/1
[ 3.643536] ukbd0 at uhidev0
[ 3.643536] wskbd1 at ukbd0 mux 1
[ 3.643536] wskbd1: connecting to wsdisplay0
[ 3.643536] uhidev1 at uhub1 port 5 configuration 1 interface 1
[ 3.643536] uhidev1: SEM (0x1a2c) USB Keyboard (0x2124), rev 1.10/1.10, addr 3, iclass 3/0
[ 3.643536] uhidev1: 2 report ids
[ 3.643536] uhid0 at uhidev1 reportid 1: input=2, output=0, feature=0
[ 3.643536] uhid1 at uhidev1 reportid 2: input=1, output=0, feature=0
[ 4.123538] uhidev2 at uhub1 port 6 configuration 1 interface 0
[ 4.123538] uhidev2: vendor 275d (0x275d) USB OPTICAL MOUSE (0x0ba6), rev 1.10/1.00, addr 4, iclass 3/1
[ 4.123538] ums0 at uhidev2: 3 buttons and Z dir
[ 4.123538] wsmouse1 at ums0 mux 0
[ 4.603537] uaudio0 at uhub1 port 9 configuration 1 interface 0
[ 4.603537] uaudio0: C-Media INC. (0x0d8c) USB Audio (0x0001), rev 1.10/0.10, addr 5
[ 4.603537] uaudio0: audio rev 1.00
[ 4.603537] audio0 at uaudio0: playback
[ 4.603537] audio0: slinear_le:16 2ch 48000Hz, blk 11520 bytes (60ms) for playback
[ 4.603537] spkr1 at audio0: PC Speaker (synthesized)
[ 4.603537] wsbell at spkr1 not configured
[11.453530] ipmi0: version 32.0 interface KCS iobase 0xca2/0x2 spacing 1
[11.453530] ipmi0: ID 19.2 IPMI 2.0 Available
[11.453530] ipmi0: Additional Chassis FRU SEL SDR Sensor
[11.453530] ipmi0: Manufacturer 0000b Product 200b
[11.453530] ipmi0: Firmware 1.32
[11.453530] swwdog0: software watchdog initialized
[11.493529] WARNING: 1 error while detecting hardware; check system log.
[11.493529] boot device: sd0
[11.493529] root on sd0a dumps on sd0b
[11.503529] root file system type: ffs
[11.503529] kern.module.path=/stand/amd64/10.0/modules
[11.503529] WARNING: NVRAM century is 33 but RTC year is 2024
[24.873516] wsdisplay0: screen 1 added (80x25, vt100 emulation)
[24.873516] wsdisplay0: screen 2 added (80x25, vt100 emulation)
[24.873516] wsdisplay0: screen 3 added (80x25, vt100 emulation)
[24.883516] wsdisplay0: screen 4 added (80x25, vt100 emulation


February 22, 2024

UnitedBSD 11ac wifi support

Recently I've got faster internet.
I notice that my two laptops are working on low speed.
Netbsd 10RC4 ifconfig claims 11a on Intel 8260,
with 18Mb/s download and cca 4Mb/s upload.
FreeBSD 14 claims 11g on Intel 3160, with the same download speed,
while upload is a little bit faster.

Good thing is, wifi WORKS. But, is there any way to improve speed?
Both interfaces support 11ac mode.
Laptops are about eight years old, and can work in 11ac mode with linux.
If BSD wifi drivers are comming from linux world, maybe it is possible.


February 20, 2024

/r/NetBSD Which Xorg input driver is used on BSD ?

Hello folks,

I'm currently reviewing/refactoring lots of xorg stuff. But since i'm only on Linux and dont know much about bsd, i wonder which drivers are used there. Is xf86-input-keyboard still needed ?

submitted by /u/metux-its
[link] [comments]
/r/NetBSD NetBSD on 486

I'd love to start a dialogue about building something useful with NetBSD on 486 computers as a platform. I'd like network and the ability to build CLI packages. If X11 is a possibility, that might be fun too - xScorched, anyone?

I did some early testing and Minix 2 was an easy candidate - as was Slackware 1.x; both have 1.44Mb installation media.

Can any of the NetBSD folks comment on where I should start, what version I should be focusing on and how installation might go.

The 486 I'm focusing on is a Dolch PAC-60. It was originally a network sniffer, so it has a network card - but I'd prefer installing through a Gotek... or at least bootstrapping from one. (I think I might quickly realize that I either need to embrace network or CD-ROM, but open to your thoughts!)

Here's a YT video I made while installing Minix 2, that shows my skill level - or lack thereof. :P https://youtu.be/y3zlb7SrI0I?si=kFmEfCze9vSPiX4x

submitted by /u/PaulLee420
[link] [comments]

February 18, 2024

Unix Stack Exchange NetBSD: how to mount a disk image?

I have create a disk image on netbsd

newfs -F -s 10G 1.img

How to mount it?

I have tried "nodev" but give error and try to mount /mnt/p2

mount -v -o nodev /home/user/1.img /mnt/p2
DragonFly BSD Digest Lazy Reading for 2024/02/18

Mini-theme: collections of media.

Your unrelated music link of the week: Omni: Souvenir.

/r/NetBSD Gnome in NetBSD

I am going to install NetBSD on a VM and I would like to install Gnome graphical enviromment can someone help me how can I do that because I can't find instructions

submitted by /u/MysteryWW
[link] [comments]

February 14, 2024

Unix Stack Exchange Is possible to find a single file of NOT installed package on Netbsd?

Simple question:

On Fedora, i want to search mplayer..

dnf provides *bin/mplayer

on Debian

apt -y install apt-file
apt-file update
apt-file search mplayer|grep bin

on Freebsd

pkg install -y pkg-provides
pkg provides -u 
pkg provides *bin/mplayer$

Anything similar on netbsd? Actually seems no similar tool exist.


February 13, 2024

Pullup pkgsrc [pullup-pkgsrc #6836] pullup-request: pkgsrc/net/bind916
Pullup pkgsrc [pullup-pkgsrc #6835] pullup-request: pkgsrc/net/bind918

February 12, 2024

Unix Stack Exchange Netbsd, what is dk?

Simple question, today making iostat on netbsd machine I see..

    iostat 2 3
          tty              ld0               ld1               dk0               dk1               dk2               dk3               dk4               cd0             CPU
     tin  tout  KB/t  t/s  MB/s   KB/t  t/s  MB/s   KB/t  t/s  MB/s   KB/t  t/s  MB/s   KB/t  t/s  MB/s   KB/t  t/s  MB/s   KB/t  t/s  MB/s   KB/t  t/s  MB/s  us ni sy in id

---explanation---

ld0 is the first virtio hd
ld1 is the second virtio hd
cd0 is the first SATA cdrom

what is dk1-4?


February 11, 2024

DragonFly BSD Digest Lazy Reading for 2024/02/11

No theme this week.


February 07, 2024

NetBSD Blog NetBSD 10.0 RC4 available!

The NetBSD project is pleased to announce the fourth (and probably last) release candidate of the upcoming 10.0 release, please help testing!
See the release announcement for details.

The netbsd-10 release branch is more than a year old now, so it is high time the 10.0 release makes it to the front stage. This matches the long time it took for the development branch to get ready for branching, a lot of development went into this new release.

This also caused the release announcement to be one of the longest we ever did.

Since RC1 there have been numerous changes, including major updates to external software included in the release: Postfix, OpenSSH, and the firmware used for Raspberry PI devices. Various issues with RC1 have been fixed, including installer (sysinst) crashes. Lots of architecture specific fixes happend, e.g. various toolchain changes for VAX (so it is now finaly self-hosting again), and kernel changes for macppc, netwinder, and alpha.

For RC3 only few (relatively) minor changes were made, including https certificate verification in libfetch (which is used by pkg_ad(1)), and also improvements to the EFI bootloader to better deal with booting from CD (or in virtual machines ISO images), plus lots of various bug fixes.

RC4 became necessary as a few very important DRM/KMS issues especially for Intel GPUs have been resolved. And as an (unexpected) bonus support for the Nintendo Wii has been added to the evbppc port.

Especially on amd64 machines please notes that we got a new DRM/KMS subsystem version, and this may lead to fallout on some hardware. Unfortunately not all known bugs from the release engineering pre-release task list could be fixed in time for this release - we will continue to improve the current state and hope to have more of them solved for the next (10.1) release.

If you want to test 10.0 RC4 please check the installation notes for your architecture and download the preferred install image from the CDN or if you are using an ARM based device from the netbsd-10 builds from the bootable ARM images page.

If you have any issues with installation or run into issues with the system during use, please contact us on one of the mailing lists or file a problem report.


February 06, 2024

The NetBSD Foundation NetBSD 10.0 RC4 is available!

February 01, 2024

Benny Siegert NetBSD 10: Thirty Years, Still Going Strong!
In 2023, the NetBSD project celebrated 30 years since its first release, 0.8. Now, four years after NetBSD 9, NetBSD 10 brings a huge number of changes and improvements. This talk will dive into the most important new features of NetBSD 10, such as performance and security improvements, expanded CPU and GPU support, improved virtualization and more! Another strength of NetBSD is its package system, pkgsrc, which is portable to dozens of other OSes and can even be used like virtualenv for development and deployment environments.

January 28, 2024

NetBSD Package System (pkgsrc) on DaemonForums Authentication error when executing pkgin
Hi all,
since last last time I executed pkgin full-upgrade , I get the following error message:

# pkgin update
processing remote summary (https://cdn.netbsd.org/pub/pkgsrc/pa...0.0_2023Q4/All)...
00886327D6700000:error:0A000086:SSL routines:tls_post_process_server_certificate:certi ficate verify failed:/usr/src/crypto/external/bsd/openssl/dist/ssl/statem/statem_clnt.c:1889:
00886327D6700000:error:0A000086:SSL routines:tls_post_process_server_certificate:certi ficate verify failed:/usr/src/crypto/external/bsd/openssl/dist/ssl/statem/statem_clnt.c:1889:
00886327D6700000:error:0A000086:SSL routines:tls_post_process_server_certificate:certi ficate verify failed:/usr/src/crypto/external/bsd/openssl/dist/ssl/statem/statem_clnt.c:1889:
pkgin: Could not fetch https://cdn.netbsd.org/pub/pkgsrc/pa...kg_summary.gz: Authentication error

Any idea how to solve this ?

I am Using NetBSD 10.0_RC3 amd64 on my home-office desktop.

Thanks,

January 21, 2024

DragonFly BSD Digest Lazy Reading for 2024/01/21

I’ve got some real gems this week.

Your unrelated extended music of the week: Bill Laswell featuring DJ Rob Swift – Reanimation.  Which of course reminds me that Rob Gets Busy.  If you like that, here’s a crazy amount of beat juggling, at its best when it creates new music and rhythms.  (via)


January 18, 2024

Ruben Schade Getting back into Emacs

My post about colour schemes mentioned that I’m writing in Vim and Emacs concurrently again. It’s even worse than that; I still also use the excellent Kate editor from the KDE project.

A few of you messaged happy to see Emacs specifically being called out, though asked how I’m running both at the same time. Jonathan also mentioned I could use Emacs’s Evil mode as a bridge if I wanted Vim keybindings.

I’ve talked before how I’m most familiar with Vim, for all the same reasons a lot of people are. I started using it in high school when it was the only editor available on remote machines, then again at university. I have muscle memory associated with a lot of its commands, though I wouldn’t call myself an expert. I know even less about nvi, though I use it to edit config files on FreeBSD and NetBSD.

Meanwhile, I’ll admit I like Emacs and microemacs. I like its inline help, command tab completion, built-in package manager, all the superfluous goodies, the fact it’s mode-less, and elisp. Vim can do a lot of this, but Emacs feels more natural? It’s hard to describe. But I’m nowhere near as proficient.

Interestingly, I don’t find myself accidentally typing commands for one editor into the other. My brain doesn’t reach for my remapped Meta key in Vim, just as I don’t reach for my remapped ESC in Emacs. What my brain can’t do is remember how to perform certain things. Need to get to the end of the line? That’s ESC+$, obviously! But what is it in Emacs?

I probably should jump ship entirely and write only in Emacs to force myself to learn.

By Ruben Schade in Sydney, 2024-01-19.


January 17, 2024

NetBSD Blog NetBSD 10.0 RC3 available!

The NetBSD project is pleased to announce the third (and probably last) release candidate of the upcoming 10.0 release, please help testing!
See the release announcement for details.

The netbsd-10 release branch is more than a year old now, so it is high time the 10.0 release makes it to the front stage. This matches the long time it took for the development branch to get ready for branching, a lot of development went into this new release.

This also caused the release announcement to be one of the longest we ever did.

Since RC1 there have been numerous changes, including major updates to external software included in the release: Postfix, OpenSSH, and the firmware used for Raspberry PI devices. Various issues with RC1 have been fixed, including installer (sysinst) crashes. Lots of architecture specific fixes happend, e.g. various toolchain changes for VAX (so it is now finaly self-hosting again), and kernel changes for macppc, netwinder, and alpha.

For RC3 only few (relatively) minor changes were made, including https certificate verification in libfetch (which is used by pkg_ad(1)), and also improvements to the EFI bootloader to better deal with booting from CD (or in virtual machines ISO images), plus lots of various bug fixes.

Especially on amd64 machines please notes that we got a new DRM/KMS subsystem version, and this may lead to fallout on some hardware. Unfortunately not all known bugs from the release engineering pre-release task list could be fixed in time for this release - we will continue to improve the current state and hope to have more of them solved for the next (10.1) release.

If you want to test 10.0 RC3 please check the installation notes for your architecture and download the preferred install image from the CDN or if you are using an ARM based device from the netbsd-10 builds from the bootable ARM images page.

If you have any issues with installation or run into issues with the system during use, please contact us on one of the mailing lists or file a problem report.

Stack Overflow Problems with $PATH on the .bashrc file

I am using a Linux Ubuntu machine, and recently, I've been having issues regarding changing the $PATH in the .bashrc file.

I want to change the $PATH in the .bashrc to install a Golang extension called goose. I was having issues with the installation, and after looking at some forums, it seems that to solve the problem, it's necessary to change the $PATH in this .bashrc file.

I replaced the data in it, removed other $PATH entries that were in the file, leaving only the ones I intended to use. However, after running echo $PATH in the terminal, it returns a $PATH that is no longer in the .bashrc.

I tried restarting the machine multiple times, re-editing the file, looked at the .profile, but I don't think that's the issue. However, nothing is working.

What can I do to resolve this problem?

.bashrc:

# ~/.bashrc: executed by bash(1) for non-login shells.
# see /usr/share/doc/bash/examples/startup-files (in the package bash-doc)
# for examples

export PATH="$PATH:$HOME/go/bin"

# If not running interactively, don't do anything
case $- in
    *i*) ;;
      *) return;;
esac

# don't put duplicate lines or lines starting with space in the history.
# See bash(1) for more options
HISTCONTROL=ignoreboth

# append to the history file, don't overwrite it
shopt -s histappend

# for setting history length see HISTSIZE and HISTFILESIZE in bash(1)
HISTSIZE=1000
HISTFILESIZE=2000

# check the window size after each command and, if necessary,
# update the values of LINES and COLUMNS.
shopt -s checkwinsize

# If set, the pattern "**" used in a pathname expansion context will
# match all files and zero or more directories and subdirectories.
#shopt -s globstar

# make less more friendly for non-text input files, see lesspipe(1)
[ -x /usr/bin/lesspipe ] && eval "$(SHELL=/bin/sh lesspipe)"

# set variable identifying the chroot you work in (used in the prompt below)
if [ -z "${debian_chroot:-}" ] && [ -r /etc/debian_chroot ]; then
    debian_chroot=$(cat /etc/debian_chroot)
fi

# set a fancy prompt (non-color, unless we know we "want" color)
case "$TERM" in
    xterm-color|*-256color) color_prompt=yes;;
esac

# uncomment for a colored prompt, if the terminal has the capability; turned
# off by default to not distract the user: the focus in a terminal window
# should be on the output of commands, not on the prompt
#force_color_prompt=yes

if [ -n "$force_color_prompt" ]; then
    if [ -x /usr/bin/tput ] && tput setaf 1 >&/dev/null; then
    # We have color support; assume it's compliant with Ecma-48
    # (ISO/IEC-6429). (Lack of such support is extremely rare, and such
    # a case would tend to support setf rather than setaf.)
    color_prompt=yes
    else
    color_prompt=
    fi
fi

if [ "$color_prompt" = yes ]; then
    PS1='${debian_chroot:+($debian_chroot)}\[\033[01;32m\]\u@\h\[\033[00m\]:\[\033[01;34m\]\w\[\033[00m\]\$ '
else
    PS1='${debian_chroot:+($debian_chroot)}\u@\h:\w\$ '
fi
unset color_prompt force_color_prompt

# If this is an xterm set the title to user@host:dir
case "$TERM" in
xterm*|rxvt*)
    PS1="\[\e]0;${debian_chroot:+($debian_chroot)}\u@\h: \w\a\]$PS1"
    ;;
*)
    ;;
esac

# enable color support of ls and also add handy aliases
if [ -x /usr/bin/dircolors ]; then
    test -r ~/.dircolors && eval "$(dircolors -b ~/.dircolors)" || eval "$(dircolors -b)"
    alias ls='ls --color=auto'
    #alias dir='dir --color=auto'
    #alias vdir='vdir --color=auto'

    alias grep='grep --color=auto'
    alias fgrep='fgrep --color=auto'
    alias egrep='egrep --color=auto'
fi

# colored GCC warnings and errors
#export GCC_COLORS='error=01;31:warning=01;35:note=01;36:caret=01;32:locus=01:quote=01'

# some more ls aliases
alias ll='ls -alF'
alias la='ls -A'
alias l='ls -CF'

# Add an "alert" alias for long running commands.  Use like so:
#   sleep 10; alert
alias alert='notify-send --urgency=low -i "$([ $? = 0 ] && echo terminal || echo error)" "$(history|tail -n1|sed -e '\''s/^\s*[0-9]\+\s*//;s/[;&|]\s*alert$//'\'')"'

# Alias definitions.
# You may want to put all your additions into a separate file like
# ~/.bash_aliases, instead of adding them here directly.
# See /usr/share/doc/bash-doc/examples in the bash-doc package.

if [ -f ~/.bash_aliases ]; then
    . ~/.bash_aliases
fi

# enable programmable completion features (you don't need to enable
# this, if it's already enabled in /etc/bash.bashrc and /etc/profile
# sources /etc/bash.bashrc).
if ! shopt -oq posix; then
  if [ -f /usr/share/bash-completion/bash_completion ]; then
    . /usr/share/bash-completion/bash_completion
  elif [ -f /etc/bash_completion ]; then
    . /etc/bash_completion
  fi
fi



export NVM_DIR="$HOME/.nvm"
[ -s "$NVM_DIR/nvm.sh" ] && \. "$NVM_DIR/nvm.sh"  # This loads nvm
[ -s "$NVM_DIR/bash_completion" ] && \. "$NVM_DIR/bash_completion"  # This loads nvm bash_completion

.profile:

# ~/.profile: executed by the command interpreter for login shells.
# This file is not read by bash(1), if ~/.bash_profile or ~/.bash_login
# exists.
# see /usr/share/doc/bash/examples/startup-files for examples.
# the files are located in the bash-doc package.

# the default umask is set in /etc/profile; for setting the umask
# for ssh logins, install and configure the libpam-umask package.
#umask 022

# if running bash
if [ -n "$BASH_VERSION" ]; then
    # include .bashrc if it exists
    if [ -f "$HOME/.bashrc" ]; then
    . "$HOME/.bashrc"
    fi
fi

# set PATH so it includes user's private bin if it exists
if [ -d "$HOME/bin" ] ; then
    PATH="$HOME/bin:$PATH"
fi

# set PATH so it includes user's private bin if it exists
if [ -d "$HOME/.local/bin" ] ; then
    PATH="$HOME/.local/bin:$PATH"
fi

What returns in the terminal:

echo $PATH

/home/zeus/.nvm/versions/node/v20.11.0/bin:/usr/local/sbin:/usr/local/bin:/usr/sbin:/usr/bin:/sbin:/bin:/usr/games:/usr/local/games:/snap/bin:/snap/bin:/home/zeus/go/bin:/home/zeus/go/bin
Stack Overflow Is it possible to authenticate a user to Azure AD (with MFA) only by using CLI?

Few developers in my organization are using Ubuntu 18.04 Server machines (no GUI). I want them to get authenticated to my organization's Azure AD from CLI alone.(not in any browser)

I tried to do that with a custom python-selenium script but I don't think that is reliable and robust. The script just

  1. Opens the Login URL,
  2. Types the username and password by xpath,
  3. Reads and prints the OTP number to be entered on the Authenticator app
  4. Waits until the user types the OTP in the device
  5. Prints the response

One more thing to add, I don't want to modify the Azure Portal's configurations whatsoever, the user still needs to use the MFA everytime to login. I don't want to use any other alternative type of logins too.

I also searched alternatives like elinks, w3m but those couldn't help the cause.

Is there any tool(better if official) that could solve this? Or is this task technically not feasible? I read online that even az-cli depends on a browser for authentication.

Stack Overflow How to force "pip download" to download all dependencies including the "setup_requires"

Here is the setup.py copied from onnx-caffe2:

setup(
    name="onnx-caffe2",
    version=VersionInfo.version,
    description="Caffe2 frontend and backend of Open Neural Network Exchange",
    install_requires=install_requires,
    setup_requires=['pytest-runner'],
    tests_require=['numpy', 'pytest-cov', 'psutil'],
    cmdclass=cmdclass,
    packages=find_packages(),
    author='bddppq',
    author_email='[email protected]',
    url='https://github.com/onnx/onnx-caffe2',
    entry_points={
        'console_scripts': [
            'convert-caffe2-to-onnx = onnx_caffe2.bin.conversion:caffe2_to_onnx',
            'convert-onnx-to-caffe2 = onnx_caffe2.bin.conversion:onnx_to_caffe2'
        ]
    },
)

Here is the requirements.txt:

...
onnx-caffe2
...

The pip download will not download any packages inside the "setup_requires":

pip download -r requirements.txt

How to force "pip download" to download all dependencies including the "setup_requires"?

If it is not possible for "pip download", then how to parse the "setup.py" to get all packages inside the "setup_requires"? What's the standard way for parsing the "setup_requires"?

Stack Overflow connection between mysql and mysql-workbench for root user

I have installed MySQL on my Linux Ubuntu 22.04 system and subsequently installed MySQL Workbench (8.0). However, upon attempting to launch Workbench for the localhost user, I encountered an error. I have attached a screenshot depicting the error, and I have also shared the websites I consulted in an attempt to resolve this issue. I would appreciate assistance in resolving the MySQL Workbench connection problem.

I checked https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LdsEkrtlgKc https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F1_fkOYgu8g https://askubuntu.com/questions/773446/unable-to-connect-via-mysql-workbench-to-localhost-in-ubuntu-16-04-passwordless MySQL Workbench cannot connect to database in Ubuntu 20.04

Stack Overflow Why can very long pipe (%>%) statements cause "Error: C stack usage is too close to the limit"?

Before I start:
I'm aware that there are quite a few threads on this error "out there" but none of them seem to narrow the problem down to very long pipe statements specifically.

By chance I came across the observation that very long pipe (%>%) statements can trigger the
"Error: C stack usage is too close to the limit" error.

Also, some machines I have access to will trigger this earlier while others will trigger it later.

Ubuntu 20.04 with R 4.0.5 (rocker/r-ver:4.0.5) tiggers later
Ubuntu 22.04 with R 4.3.2 (rocker/r-ver:4.3.2) tiggers earlier

Both machines return 8192 for ulimit -s.

Since I don't want to paste hundreds of lines of redundant code here I will give an example that will need to be adapted for personal reproduction on your local machine. Repeating the piping into the mutate() statement about 1000 times should do the trick on most machines.

library(dplyr)

df <- data.frame(col1 = 1:10000)

df <- df %>%
  mutate(col1 = 1)

  # uncomment and copy paste below lines until about 1000 mutate() statements are used
  #mutate(col1 = 1) %>%
  #mutate(col1 = 1) %>%
  #mutate(col1 = 1) %>%

As a solution I now break down long pipes into smaller chunks so that's easy enough really. I'm still interested in some more background on the topic.

Why does this trigger that error and does anyone have general thoughts on the topic?


January 16, 2024

The NetBSD Foundation NetBSD 10.0 RC3 is available!

January 12, 2024

Ruben Schade Coping with distractions, or something else?

I’ve been struggling a lot with distractions over the last couple of years. I’ll have something I need to do, or even want to do, and there’s this invisible mental barrier I can’t seem to punch through. It doesn’t even seem to be strongly correlated with what I’m doing, where I am, or my energy levels.

I’ve been at this coffee shop for an hour this morning, and it’s been almost impossible to focus on anything. My eyes dart from the macOS dock, to an email on my phone, to an awful song playing on their speakers, to wondering if what I’m saving for is useful, to updating packages. I’ll do each in turn for 10-30 seconds before darting to the next one. It leaves me feeling unproductive, unfulfilled, and frustrated!

But here’s the thing. I was here yesterday, with more to do, and didn’t have this problem whatsoever. I was able to sit here and write dozens of pages of a compliance document without a second thought. I did probably the equivalent of a week’s work in a few hours.

I’ve been blaming open-plan offices and always-online chat rooms for this in a work setting, but I think there’s something more going on. While constant interruptions, discussions, and distractions are certainly ruinous for productivity and focus, I think it only exacerbates something else.

Talking with friends who have ADD and related mental challenges, I think it’s unlikely I have it. These tend to be life-long afflictions, and I only seem to have noticed it fairly recently. Maybe it’s another way burnout manifests? But then, how does one explain the variability?

One thing is for sure, it’s taken an hour to write this post! An ancient Avril Lavigne song came on the radio, which reminded me of high school, which took me back to this one weird interaction involving pretzels. There was that great German restaurant in Singapore called Werner’s Oven, and they… wait, didn’t they have that issue with their Wi-Fi modem that time? We need a new Wi-Fi access point at home, and probably a new pfSense box, maybe one of those cute passively-cooled boxes that, mmm, passively cooled, I need to book the aircon servicing people because the filter needs changing. Is that how you spell Avril Lavigne? Why did pkgsrc error out on that LaTeX package, did I… oh, my tethering dropped off, DAMN IT I keep forgetting to switch over to the new phone with all my profiles and, did I remember to charge the other one? Which dock is it connected to again? Something about tables.

By Ruben Schade in Sydney, 2024-01-13.


January 07, 2024

DragonFly BSD Digest Lazy Reading for 2024/01/07

Of course the first thing I did was type the wrong year into the title of this post.

 


January 05, 2024

Ruben Schade Exploring FreeBSD service(8) basics

A service in BSD land is a rc.d script that can be invoked on boot, or by the root operator after booting.

These are table stakes for any online guide, but I often see people making the same mistakes, or not doing things in the most efficient way. I think this might be due to Linux people porting their guides, without understanding BSD specifics. I thought it was worth taking a quick look.

Starting a service

You start a service by executing its rc.d script. Like NetBSD, FreeBSD’s default location is here:

# /etc/rc.d/openntpd

In addition, services you install via ports may reside under local:

# /usr/local/etc/rc.d/openntpd

(Thanks to Felix J. Ogris and @Azunyan for correcting a typo there).

A shortcut to these is the service(8) command, which Douglas Barton first wrote for FreeBSD 7.3, and was ported to NetBSD 7.0 by Adrian Steinmann. This should look familiar to those of you from penguin-land:

# service openntpd start

But here’s where you might run into your first problem.

Cannot 'start' openntpd. Set openntpd_enable to 
YES in /etc/rc.conf or use 'onestart' instead of 'start'.

OSs like Debian will tend to enable and start services as soon as you install them. This is great for instant gratification, but the BSDs are more cautious. Personally, the last thing I’d want for a network-facing service is to have it enabled before I’ve configured it, or locked it down.

As it suggests, you can run onestart instead of start if you want to launch the service immediately. But for a persistent service, you’ll want to enable it.

Manually enabling a service

You enable a service by including a line in FreeBSD and NetBSD’s /etc/rc.conf file. On FreeBSD:

openntpd_enable="YES"

And on NetBSD:

openntpd=YES

Another location you can write files to enable services is in /etc/rc.conf.d/. Like all configuration directories, this can be useful if you want to keep your base rc.conf file the same across a fleet, and drop in specifics into a seperate location.

There are even more places, which can be invoked at different times. Refer to rc.local(8) for details.

But how to write to these files? Online guides will tend to suggest you write these lines manually, or do something like this:

# echo openntpd_enable="YES" >> /etc/rc.conf
# echo openntpd=YES >> /etc/rc.conf

Or if they’re a bit more clued-in:

# printf "%s\n" openntpd_enable="YES" >> /etc/rc.conf

This usually works, but there are better ways.

Smarter ways of enabling services

Starting with FreeBSD 9.2, we have Devin Teske’s sysrc(8) tool. This updates your rc.conf in an idempotent fashion. This means you don’t end up with duplicate and/or contradictory lines if you accidentally add config twice.

# sysrc openntpd_enable="YES"

But it can also configure much more, and can even append config to existing lines. This is where it really shines:

# sysrc update_motd="NO"
# sysrc jail_start+="lb minecraft hatsunemiku"

Keen-eyed readers may have just spot an issue though. While you typically enable and start a service with the same name, they don’t always match. Did you know you enable/disable motd(8) with update_motd instead? Another example is MariaDB:

sysrc mysql_enable="YES"
service mysql-server start

It’s important to note that sysrc(8), echo(1), and printf(1) will dutifully write whatever config you request, regardless of their validity. There’s a joke in there somewhere about writing tenders; ask me how I know.

An even smarter way to enable services

In this case, it’s usually better to enable services with the surprisingly-named enable command:

# service openntpd enable
# service openntpd start

This requires the rc.d script to have been written with the appropriate configuration, though I’ve yet to come across something from pkgsrc or FreeBSD ports that doesn’t have such config.

NetBSD rc.d scripts don’t have an enable function like this, at least from the ones I’ve tried. I’m continuing to grow my personal NetBSD knowledge, so if there’s an equivilent tool for it, let me know!

Conclusion

Could this entire post have just been that last code block? Probably! But I enjoy reading when other people follow a train of thought and explore something, rather than just doing a couple lines wrapped in boilerplate to sell ads.

Happy BSD daemon’ing. 😈

By Ruben Schade in Sydney, 2024-01-05.


January 04, 2024

NetBSD Blog NetBSD 10.0 RC2 available!

The NetBSD project is pleased to announce the second (and probably last) release candidate of the upcoming 10.0 release, please help testing!
See the release announcement for details.

The netbsd-10 release branch is more than a year old now, so it is high time the 10.0 release makes it to the front stage. This matches the long time it took for the development branch to get ready for branching, a lot of development went into this new release.

This also caused the release announcement to be one of the longest we ever did.

Since RC1 there have been numerous changes, including major updates to external software included in the release: Postfix, OpenSSH, and the firmware used for Raspberry PI devices. Various issues with RC1 have been fixed, including installer (sysinst) crashes. Lots of architecture specific fixes happend, e.g. various toolchain changes for VAX (so it is now finaly self-hosting again), and kernel changes for macppc, netwinder, and alpha.

Especially on amd64 machines please notes that we got a new DRM/KMS subsystem version, and this may lead to fallout on some hardware. Unfortunately not all known bugs from the release engineering pre-release task list could be fixed in time for this release - we will continue to improve the current state and hope to have more of them solved for the next (10.1) release.

If you want to test 10.0 RC2 please check the installation notes for your architecture and download the preferred install image from the CDN or if you are using an ARM based device from the netbsd-10 builds from the bootable ARM images page.

If you have any issues with installation or run into issues with the system during use, please contact us on one of the mailing lists or file a problem report.


January 01, 2024

The NetBSD Foundation NetBSD 10.0 RC2 is available!

December 31, 2023

DragonFly BSD Digest Lazy Reading for 2023/12/31

Happy new year!  More BSD content in this week’s summary than usual.

Your unrelated music of the week: Don Leisure, Halal Cool J.  Music’s good, title’s hilarious.  (via)


December 28, 2023

NetBSD General on DaemonForums How to use bluetooth earphones?
I had follow the instructions on the site
Code:

btconfig ubt0 inquiry
echo "00:14:51:c1:b9:2d mouse" >>/etc/bluetooth/hosts
btpin -d ubt0 -a mouse -p 0000
btdevctl -d ubt0 -a mouse -s HID

Code:

btdevctl: service HID not found
I don't need a pin number to connect to my earphones

December 23, 2023

Ruben Schade Organising email by source into six folders

2023 was the year I changed up how I organise email, so I thought it might be fun to do a bit of a nerdy discussion on how it went.

For some context, I’ve been carrying the same Netscape, then Mozilla, then Thunderbird profile since I was in primary school in the late 1990s. It went from a Pacific Internet Singapore address, to a Hotmail, to a Gmail, then my current domain. I’m sure many of you have email far older than this, but it’s still oddly fun going back to what I sent as a kid.

I’ve always been a bit obsessive when it comes to organisation; I’m sure surprising none of you. I settled on sorting email based on a set of fairly arbitrary categories that morphed and evolved into about 180 folders and sub-folders. A dozen or so of these were auto-sorted, but to this day I still tend to hand sort and archive as it comes in. Like manual account reconciliation, it’s my way of making sure I don’t miss things (though getting the mental space to reply to what I’m supposed to really became a crapshoot this year, to which many of you can attest).

This year, I made a clean break and had a “2023” root archive folder, and sorted email based on source, rather than categories. Namely:

… and that was it!

The People folder turned out to be the best decision here. The vast, vast majority of email I get now is mass-delivered or auto-generated. When I get an email from someone, as opposed to something, it’s special.

Towards the end of the year, I started cheating and using Thunderbird Saved Searches as “subfolders” under some of these. This way, I could quickly differentiate between various mailing lists, such as ausnog, freebsd-doc, and netbsd-users. A part of me thinks I should have made an exception for lists, but this has worked surprisingly well.

The other change is that I’m spawning a new folder for each year going forward. I’ve done this for my documents folders since I ferried stuff to school on Zip Disks, and it’s worked really well.

I’d better get started in finishing off my sorting for this year so I can start a 2024 folder.

By Ruben Schade in Sydney, 2023-12-24.


December 16, 2023

NetBSD General on DaemonForums NetBSD ARM SMP limited to 5?
I have been having some fun lately with my Odroid XU4 running NetBSD 9.2. I even have a 'desktop' using X windows via the virtual framebuffer server Xvfb (since the ARM NetBSD build does not yet do native real framebuffers).

It works pretty well, but I notice on long compilations such as firefox, I can only ever see 5 cores running in 'top' view for the c compiler, even though the Odroid is an eight core board. Is the limit 5 cores for all architectures, or what?